Google+
Quote
NAVIGATION
PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2014
    By Inge De Becker, M.D. | The Chronicle Herald (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
    As a Canadian physician who now lives south of the 49th parallel, I’m alarmed that Canada’s publicly financed national health-care system is once again under attack

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2014
    By Jessica Schorr Saxe, M.D. | Vancouver Sun
    The middle-aged woman came to my family medicine practice for a routine visit to check her high blood pressure. It was the highest I’ve ever seen in the office: 280/180. I told her to go to the emergency department for probable admission to the hospital.

  • Posted on Monday, August 25, 2014
    By Thomas Meisenhelder | San Bernardino County (Calif.) Sun
    On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the nation’s most successful medical care program, Medicare. This year marks the 49th anniversary of our commitment to provide good, accessible health care to those over 65. This program has been hugely successful and now covers 98 percent of the country’s senior citizens. Medicare costs rise more slowly than other health care costs and seniors with Medicare are more satisfied with their health care than those with private insurance.

  • Posted on Monday, August 25, 2014
    By C.V. Allen | The Modesto (Calif.) Bee
    The following is part myth (the government doesn’t sell auto insurance) and part reality – an example of how an insurance program can be gamed for private benefit to the detriment of the public – which is very much the issue.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    The following is an unofficial transcript of parts of an interview that Dr. Steven Nissen, chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, gave to Ed “Flash” Ferenc, host of the labor-oriented, Cleveland-based America’s Work Force Radio, on Aug. 15, 2014. In addition to the points he makes below, Dr. Nissen also spoke about pharmaceutical drug safety and other issues.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    By Brian Steele | Masslive.com
    Decades have passed, but on Wednesday, Aug. 20, members of a group called Physicians for a National Health Program plan to rally before a gubernatorial health care forum at The Dimock Center in Roxbury, calling on all the candidates to agree to push for a new single-payer system if they're elected.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    By John Tozzi | Bloomberg Businessweek
    Sovaldi, a highly effective treatment for the liver disease hepatitis C, has faced backlash in the U.S. over its price tag: $84,000 for a three-month course of treatment, or about $1,000 a pill. The private insurance industry has pushed back hard on the price. State Medicaid directors have said they are concerned about the cost, and paying for the drug is also problematic for prison systems, which must provide health for a lot of inmates who acquired hepatitis C by sharing needles.

  • Posted on Monday, August 18, 2014
    By Kay Tillow | Firedoglake
    Despite passage of the 2010 health care reform bill, employers continue to push for cuts in benefits and to shift costs to workers in higher monthly payments, co-pays, and deductibles.

  • Posted on Monday, August 18, 2014
    By the editors | Managed Care
    At a time when the Affordable Care Act is widely reviled and even liberals are lukewarm in their support, Ray E. Drasga, MD, is an outlier. Based partly on his experience at a free clinic in a middle-class town, he says the nation needs a single-payer system, that the ACA doesn’t go nearly far enough in covering the uninsured. And he’s not shy about it.

  • Posted on Monday, August 18, 2014
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D.
    The TPP will raise the cost of health care, particularly of medications, by extending the length of patents, placing barriers to generics and giving the pharmaceutical and medical device industries greater legal standing to challenge reimbursements.

  • Posted on Friday, August 15, 2014
    By Jen Gunter, M.D. | Dr. Jen Gunter's 'Wielding the lasso of truth' blog
    You know it’s going to be one of those days when one of the first tweets on vacation inquires about the closest hospital.

  • Posted on Friday, August 15, 2014
    By Public Citizen | Press release
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued draft guidance that would let the pharmaceutical industry essentially circumvent drug labeling rules and tell doctors that its products have fewer risks than those described in the FDA-approved labeling. This issue is discussed by Dr. Sidney Wolfe, founder and senior adviser of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, in an article published in JAMA Internal Medicine today.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2014
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    As I’ve written before, the costs of unnecessary complexity in healthcare reform are very high, and they are rising. There are at least three recent examples.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2014
    By Sandra F. Penn, M.D. | Albuquerque Journal
    Remember when Sen. Domenici became an advocate for mental health parity? It came as no surprise to some of us that he had a “close relative” with mental health challenges.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014
    By Morolake Amole | AMSA 'On Call' blog
    The problem with health care in the United States is not that we suffer from inadequate medical resources. Quite the contrary.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014
    By Paola Totaro | The Guardian (U.K.)
    I found the lump a fortnight ago while on a work assignment in Vilnius, Lithuania. It was a hot, sunny day in the landlocked capital but as my fingers discovered what felt like a ping pong ball sized growth, ice went through my veins. I am not a catastrophist by nature but within seconds, I had envisaged the worst and by the time I was in the air homeward bound for Heathrow a few days later, I was writing my will in my head.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014
    By Sydney M. Wolfe, M.D. | The BMJ
    In 1992, because of widespread concern that the US Food and Drug Administration was taking too long to approve drugs, the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) was enacted, authorizing the FDA to collect user fees from drug companies to expedite the approval process. Besides providing funding for an increased FDA staff, the act established performance goals during the approval process to ensure more rapid review.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2014
    By Burkely Hermann | Citizen Vox blog (Public Citizen)
    Lobbying usually gets a bad rap, and sometimes for good reason: it can be part of corporate special interest money’s current corruption of the political system. But during the first-ever national Single-Payer Lobby Day events in May, real people lobbied for a good cause that benefited the general public, not just a wealthy few.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2014
    By Lois A. Bowers | Long-Term Living
    Should for-profit home health agencies continue to receive Medicare reimbursement for the services they provide? That's the question authors of a new study published in Health Affairs are asking after they found that the entities scored slightly but statistically significantly worse on some quality indicators compared with their nonprofit counterparts.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2014
    By Ann Troy, M.D. | Pacific Sun (San Rafael, Calif.)
    Congress created Medicare 49 years ago to provide seniors with health care, protection against financial ruin and peace of mind. All you needed was proof of age, citizenship (or legal residency) and you were covered. It was so simple and straightforward that all seniors were enrolled in six months, in the pre-computer era—using index cards!