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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By Danny Ash, M4 | KevinMD.com
    At a crowded townhall meeting in 1959, an elderly woman stepped up to the microphone and spoke to a panel of senators. “I am not worried for my son’s time,” she began. “He is 35, and I am sure he will face a better future when his time comes to retire. But what is to be done for those of us who need help right now?”

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By Jessica Schorr Saxe, M.D. | The Charlotte (N.C.) Observer
    On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare into law, making 19 million Americans aged 65 and over eligible for health care coverage.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By Ed Weisbart, MD | St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    Medicare is today entering its 50th year, and the need to expand it to all Americans has never been greater.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By David Ball, RN, MHA | The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC)
    Today is Medicare's 49th anniversary, having become law in 1965 under President Lyndon B. Johnson. Before 1965, as many elderly became sick but too old to work, they simply became impoverished and died.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By Vijay Das | CNN
    On this date, July 30, nearly a half-century ago, the United States achieved a major victory. Medicare, the nation's first national health insurance program, was born. As part of President Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, Medicare extended health coverage to seniors who inevitably needed care. It's been a well-accepted success and highlights the benefits of improving health care access.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    By Aaron E. Carroll, M.D. | The New York Times
    “Pay for performance” is one of those slogans that seem to upset no one. To most people it’s a no-brainer that we should pay for quality and not quantity. We all know that paying doctors based on the amount of care they provide, as we do with a traditional fee-for-service setup, creates incentives for them to give more care. It leads to increased health care spending. Changing the payment structure to pay them for achieving goals instead should reduce wasteful spending.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2014
    By Karen Garloch | The Charlotte Observer
    As a primary care physician, now retired and volunteering at free clinics, Dr. Ed Weisbart sees plenty of evidence that the U.S. health care system isn’t working.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2014
    By Richard Propp, M.D. | Times Union (Albany, N.Y.)
    Happy 49th birthday, Medicare. What a bargain — what simplicity — and what a benefit, when compared to the cost and availability of health care to those under 65.

  • Posted on Monday, July 28, 2014
    By Donna Smith | Common Dreams
    Remember Liz Fowler? She was the WellPoint executive who took a brief sabbatical from her direct paychecks from the private health insurance industry to write the Affordable Care Act while working for Senator Max Baucus. Once that project was wrapped up, Liz went to work briefly for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as she transitioned her way back to work as a lobbyist for health industry giant Johnson & Johnson.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 23, 2014
    By David Lotto, Ph.D., and Michael Kaplan, M.D. | The Berkshire Eagle (Mass.)
    On July 10, Mr. Jim Balfanz wrote a letter to the editor titled: "Dangers of single-payer on display" in which he makes two claims. The first is that what he calls the "Veterans Administration health care corruption scandal" happened because the VA is a government-run single-payer program. The second claim he makes is that the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare or the ACA) is on the road to creating a single-payer system for everyone in the country.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 23, 2014
    By Ted Van Dyk | Crosscut.com (Seattle)
    The Western Washington Chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program, which advocates for a universal, comprehensive single-payer national health program, held its annual public meeting last Saturday evening at Kane Hall on the University of Washington campus. The event provided a useful snapshot of things to come in healthcare politics nationally, but also here in Washington State.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 22, 2014
    By A.W. Gaffney, M.D. | New Politics
    The Affordable Care Act commentariat—including those confidently awaiting the day when all its promises are vindicated, those rooting for its ignominious demise, and those of us in a separate camp—have been kept occupied in recent months. Between autumn’s website drama and winter’s enrollment saga, the news cycle has been full of stories of IT dysfunctions tackled, right-wing challenges thwarted, enrollment goals met, electoral prospects threatened, and individuals newly insured (or variously dissatisfied).

  • Posted on Monday, July 21, 2014
    By Steve Jacob | Dallas/Fort Worth Healthcare Daily
    The U.S. spends about three times as much on healthcare administration and insurance per capita as Canada. Brookings Institution economist Henry Aaron estimated in 2003 that the U.S. would save more than $213 billion annually in administration and insurance costs if it had a single-payer system similar to that nation’s.

  • Posted on Friday, July 18, 2014
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    The U.S. healthcare system costs each of us about twice as much as those in other wealthy countries. Are we getting our money’s worth? Not by a long shot.

  • Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2014
    By Austin Curry | Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)
    Medicare, the most successful health care program ever to come out of Congress, will begin its 50th year of service to millions of older Americans this month, with an overhead rate of only 1.4 percent. Yet some are calling for a voucher system. Why?

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2014
    By David U. Himmelstein, M.D. | The New York Times
    The best way to shorten waits to see a doctor (editorial, July 8) is to reduce physicians’ crushing paperwork burden. The average American doctor spends almost nine hours each week on billing and bureaucratic tasks, twice the time spent by physicians in Canada.

  • Posted on Friday, July 11, 2014
    By John Geyman, M.D. | Copernicus Healthcare
    The V.A. scandal over access to care for our veterans is, of course, a betrayal of our government’s debt to our veterans and a national disgrace that needs fixing on an urgent basis. Typical of such scandals, there is piling on from all quarters about what should be done, although we still don’t know the full extent of the problems.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 9, 2014
    By Stephen Kemble, M.D. | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
    Hawaii physicians are being offered contracts to join a “clinically integrated physician network” (CIPN) with Queen’s Medical Center through one of the local physician organizations. This is the next phase in implementation of health care payment and delivery system reforms envisioned under the Affordable Care Act.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 9, 2014
    By Fred Rotondaro and Christopher J. Hale | TIME Magazine
    Now that the initial shouting and -— at times -— vitriol from both sides has subsided after Monday’s Supreme Court ruling in the Hobby Lobby case, it’s time to take a sober look at what the ruling says about the future of health care reform in the United States. The majority’s ruling was an imperfect solution to a complicated case involving the reach of religious liberty to exempt organizations from providing certain medical benefits that they find morally objectionable to their employees.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 8, 2014
    By Adam Gaffney, MD | USA Today
    Living in poverty is hard enough; having to face sickness without insurance while doing so is a fate no one should bear.