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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

The Physicians' Proposal for Single-Payer Health Care Reform has also garnered significant media attention since its release in May 2016. To read and view coverage of the proposal, please click here. If you would like to endorse the proposal, click here.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2016
    By Jeanne Lenzer | The BMJ, Sept. 27, 2016
    The 90 minute presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ended last night without a single word about healthcare. Yet two-thirds of voters said “the future of Medicare and access and affordability of healthcare are top priorities for the candidates to be talking about during the 2016 presidential campaign.”

  • Posted on Friday, September 23, 2016
    By Jack Bernard | AL.com (Huntsville, Ala.), Sept. 23, 2016
    Black Lives Matter has its supporters (43 percent of Americans, per Pew Research Center), as well as its detractors (22 percent), but one thing is unmistakable: it has brought visibility to a very real problem. For too long, the general public has ignored the increasingly frequent violence against African-Americans, especially men.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    By F. Douglas Stephenson, LCSW, LMFT, BCD | The Gainesville (Fla.) Sun, Sept. 18, 2016
    Just like large health insurance corporations, BigPharma has the inherent tendency to invent new needs, disregard all boundaries and turn everything into an object for sale and big profit.

  • Posted on Monday, September 19, 2016
    By Paul Gorman, M.D. | Portland (Ore.) Business Journal, Sept. 15, 2016
    Working as an Oregon physician for over 30 years, in small town primary care and big city academic medical centers, I have become convinced that single payer is the only way to achieve the health care system we need and deserve.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2016
    By Carol Poplin, M.D., J.D. | MedPage Today, Sept. 6, 2016
    Under the ACA, the goal for insurers is to price their policies low enough to attract the healthy, but high enough to cover the costs of the sick. But even with giant computers, Big Data, and armies of actuaries, that may not be possible. It is certainly not the standard insurance business plan.

  • Posted on Friday, September 2, 2016
    By Adam Gaffney, M.D. | Jacobin, Sept. 2, 2016
    If epinephrine autoinjectors are to be stockpiled in public places like schools throughout the nation, and if they are optimally identical, then they constitute a significant public health concern that cannot be left to the caprice of one or two oligopolistic firms.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 1, 2016
    By Robert Rosofsky | The Boston Globe, Aug. 31, 2016
    As both an EpiPen carrier and a public health informatics consultant, I closely follow facts and opinions regarding medication pricing. The Boston Globe’s editorial about Mylan’s pricing of its EpiPens (“EpiPen maker sticks it to patients — again”) provides only a mild call to action — that of modifying provisions in the Affordable Care Act and calling for consumers and elected officials to rail against Mylan.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 1, 2016
    By Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., M.P.H., Adam Gaffney, M.D., and David Himmelstein, M.D. | MedPage Today, Aug. 26, 2016
    There can be no doubt that the ACA improved both coverage and access to care. The number of uninsured has fallen by 41%, with the largest gains among the poor, near-poor, and minorities. The percentage of Americans unable to afford medications or needed care has also fallen, although more modestly. Yet post-ACA, more than a quarter of poor non-elderly adults remains uninsured. Moreover, high out-of-pocket costs continue to deter many of those with coverage from seeking care when they need it.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 1, 2016
    By Elizabeth Rosenthal, M.D. | The New York Times, Aug. 25, 2016
    How many times must it be demonstrated that health care cannot be treated like any other market commodity before our legislators get the point? This article once again confirms that affordable health care can’t be delivered using a private, for-profit system.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 1, 2016
    By Ed Weisbart, M.D. | St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Letters, Aug. 26, 2016
    When I read that Aetna was pulling out of the Missouri health insurance marketplace, I immediately reached for my wallet to see which insurance company I have this year.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2016
    By Sarah Lazare | AlterNet, Aug. 25, 2016
    The pharmaceutical giant Mylan has a public uproar on its hands over its 500 percent price increase for a life-saving device known as EpiPen, which delivers emergency shots of the hormone epinephrine to treat potentially deadly anaphylaxis.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016
    By Craig Klugman, Ph.D. | Bioethics.net Blog, Aug. 24, 2016
    In Illinois, Land of Lincoln insurance and Aetna announced that they are pulling out of the health insurance Marketplace. In other states, United HealthCare and Humana have announced pulling out of the exchanges. As a result, many newspaper headlines and political pundits have declared the Affordable Care Act (ACA, also known as Obamacare) to be in a “death spiral.”

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016
    By Scott Harris | Between the Lines Radio News, Aug. 24, 2016
    Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, co-founder of the group Physicians for a National Health Program and a professor at the City University of New York’s School of Public Health at Hunter College, examines the decision by Aetna to pull out of state ACA exchanges, the problems of coverage created by for-profit medicine, and her support for establishing a single-payer, Medicare-for-All system that would provide universal, affordable care to everyone in the U.S.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2016
    By Dr. Jen Gunter | Dr. Gunter's Wordpress Blog, August 20, 2016
    Two years ago I wrote about my experience in a London emergency department with my son, Victor. That post has since been viewed > 450,000 times. There are over 800 comments with no trolls (a feat unto itself) and almost all of them express love for the NHS. I was in England again this week. And yes, I was back in an emergency department, but this time with my cousin (who is English). This is what happened.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 23, 2016
    By Ture Richard Turnbull | Jamaica Plain (Mass.) News, Aug. 22, 2016
    The Boston City Council will take a bold step on Wednesday, August 24, by passing a resolution reaffirming its support for a single-payer health care system. The resolution calls upon the state legislature in the upcoming 2017-2018 legislative session to propose and pass a measure to achieve a single-payer system in the Commonwealth.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 23, 2016
    By Kay Tillow | The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Ky.), letters, Aug. 23, 2016
    No one should cry for Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini over his claim of losses in the Obamacare exchange plans. Bertolini raked in $27.9 million in total compensation in 2015.

  • Posted on Monday, August 22, 2016
    Interview with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler | The Real News Network, Aug. 19, 2016
    Aetna's decision to withdraw from ACA marketplaces shows that it's a very bad idea to try to get to universal coverage through private insurance companies. Private insurance companies are there to make a profit, and the minute they stop making profit, they want to pull out.

  • Posted on Monday, August 22, 2016
    By Steve Sebelius | Las Vegas Review-Journal, Aug. 20, 2016
    During the Democratic primary, as Bernie Sanders battled Hillary Clinton for the nomination, a strong disagreement emerged over health care. Sanders — who has supported a single-payer health care system similar to those in Canada and Great Britain — asked voters why America can’t do the same thing.

  • Posted on Monday, August 22, 2016
    By Ahmed Kutty, M.D. | Monadnock Ledger-Transcript (Peterborough, N.H.), Aug. 16, 2016
    In July 1965, President Lyndon Johnson had to settle for half a loaf, in lieu of the full loaf that three predecessors in The White House (Teddy Roosevelt in 1912, FDR in 1935 and Harry Truman in 1948) had proposed or attempted to legislate: a national health plan.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2016
    Interview with Ed ‘Flash’ Ferenc | America’s Work Force Radio, March 30, 2016
    In this segment of the interview, Dr. Coates talks about how a single-payer, improved-Medicare-for-All system would benefit everyone who lives in the United States.