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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest Archives

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Thursday, December 5, 2013
    By Stephen B. Kemble, M.D. | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
    I attended the recent Hawaii 2013 Healthcare Summit, on how Hawaii is implementing the Affordable Care Act and transforming health care. The keynote address by Dr. Abraham Verghese was inspiring — all about the sanctity of the doctor-patient relationship and how health care should be focused on the living patient, not the “iPatient” in the computer.

  • Posted on Thursday, December 5, 2013
    By Pamela Peters, MS1 | Pritzker News, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine
    Six students from Pritzker explored the option of single-payer health care reform by attending the annual meeting for the advocacy group Physicians for a National Program (PNHP) on November 2, 2013 in Boston.

  • Posted on Wednesday, December 4, 2013
    By Evan Soltas | Bloomberg
    For an industry that's supposed to be burdened by the launch of Obamacare, the health-care business is doing pretty well. Stocks of health-care companies are up almost 40 percent this year, the strongest performance of any sector in the S&P 500.

  • Posted on Monday, December 2, 2013
    By RoseAnn DeMoro | The Guardian (U.K.)
    There's no reason to rollback the progress the ACA has made. But we should go all the way and dump the for-profit system

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 27, 2013
    By Nancy Folbre | The New York Times
    A single-payer insurance system, whether based on an extension of Medicare or on the Canadian model, promises many profoundly important benefits. Right off the mark, it promises simplicity.

  • Posted on Friday, November 22, 2013
    By Jeffrey Young | Huffington Post
    The botched implementation of Obamacare has created a bittersweet moment for advocates of a universal, single-payer health care system: They saw this coming, but they can't gloat about it.

  • Posted on Friday, November 22, 2013
    By the Editorial Board | San Francisco Bay Guardian
    We're sorry to see all the problems surrounding President Obama's Affordable Care Act, which has made some important improvements to the country's healthcare system, such as helping those with preexisting conditions get coverage and preventing those who do have coverage from being arbitrarily dropped. Given a break from being exploited by the insurance industry, there's no way this country's citizens will want to go back to how things were.

  • Posted on Friday, November 22, 2013
    By Ralph Nader | The Nader Page
    Costly complexity is baked into Obamacare. No health insurance system is without problems but Canadian style single-payer full Medicare for all is simple, affordable, comprehensive and universal.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 21, 2013
    By Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., and David Himmelstein, M.D.
    Virtually all single-payer supporters aspire to a nationwide reform. Absent a national solution, many regions with the gravest problems in access to care will lag further and further behind. Living in New York or Massachusetts doesn’t lessen our sense of responsibility for millions in the Deep South and other “red state” areas for whom national legislation is the only realistic option for health care progress.

  • Posted on Monday, November 18, 2013
    Truthout
    Here are three items of special interest to single-payer supporters who were involved with, or followed, the Occupy Wall Street movement.

  • Posted on Monday, November 18, 2013
    By Miranda Rosenberg | The Hartford Courant
    While most Americans have been focusing on the recent problems surrounding the rollout of the new healthcare.gov website, another health insurance story has been largely overlooked. Last month, just as Medicare's open enrollment period was set to begin, UnitedHealthcare dropped thousands of physicians nation-wide, including thousands in Connecticut, from its Medicare Advantage programs without an explanation.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 14, 2013
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    Serious problems with the websites created by the Affordable Care Act continue, and probably will for a long time. Although frantic efforts at incrementally improving them are being made by the Obama administration, and some sites are working better than others, they are a long way from working well.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 14, 2013
    By Caroline Poplin, M.D. | Newsday
    The Obama administration has once again snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. After successfully holding off Republican efforts to destroy Obamacare by shutting down the government and threatening default, the administration badly bungled the rollout of the crown jewel of health reform: the insurance exchanges.

  • Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013
    By John Nichols | The Nation
    Gene Farley and I shared a deep affection for Tommy Douglas, the Baptist preacher-turned-statesman who as the leader of Saskatchewan’s Cooperative Commonwealth Federation established the framework for what would become Canada’s single-payer national health care system.

  • Posted on Friday, November 8, 2013
    By Donald Broder, M.D. | The New York Times
    Nicholas D. Kristof points out that without universal health care, many of us die prematurely. But before we solve this terrible problem, we have to grapple with our confusion and ambivalence as to what, if any, responsibilities we have for one another.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 6, 2013
    By Stacey Singer | Palm Beach Post
    As consumers begin to comparison shop “Obamacare” health plans, a new problem has emerged: The cheapest plans may have such limited provider panels that the nearest in-network hospital could be about 30 miles away for people living in northern and western Palm Beach County.

  • Posted on Friday, November 1, 2013
    By David Sirota | Salon
    Whenever scandal arises in Washington, D.C., the fight between the two parties typically ends up being a competition to identify a concise message in the chaos — or, as scientists might say, a signal in all the noise. This week confirms that truism, as glitches plagued the new Obamacare website and as insurance companies canceled policies for many customers on the individual market.

  • Posted on Friday, November 1, 2013
    By Ralph Nader | The Nader Page
    With the Tea Partiers relentless attacks on each of the troubles besetting Obamacare since its complicated, computer glitch-ridden startup on October 1, 2013, the compelling question is: Why aren’t the Congressional sponsors of H.R. 676 – full Medicare for all with free choice of physician and hospital – speaking out as strongly on behalf of this far superior universal health care coverage?

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2013
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D. | Talk Nation Radio
    The following is an unofficial transcript of an interview given by Dr. Margaret Flowers to David Swanson of Talk Nation Radio on the Pacifica Network on Oct. 30. An audio version is also available.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2013
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D. | The Indypendent (New York City)
    The battle lines have been drawn and the Inside-the-Beltway media circus is underway.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013
    By Michael Lind | Salon
    If Obamacare — built on means-testing, privatizing and decentralization to the states — is treated by progressives as the greatest liberal public policy success in the last half-century, then how will progressives be able to argue against proposals by conservative Republicans and center-right neoliberal Democrats to means-test, privatize and decentralize Social Security and Medicare in the years ahead?

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013
    By Leigh Dolin, M.D. | The Lund Report (Portland, Ore.)
    If competition is so wonderful, why don’t we have competing police departments, fire departments and armed services? Clearly, the business model -- competition and making a profit -- is not always appropriate.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 29, 2013
    By David Freudberg | The Huffington Post
    I'm not sure which is more incomprehensible: the ham-handed launch of registration for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or the system's mind-numbing complexity. But the two are related.

  • Posted on Monday, October 28, 2013
    By Dave Gram | Modern Healthcare
    As states open insurance marketplaces amid uncertainty about whether they're a solution for healthcare, Vermont is eyeing a bigger goal, one that more fully embraces a government-funded model.

  • Posted on Monday, October 28, 2013
    By Jack Bernard | The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle
    With private insurance covering most of the employed and 48 million uninsured, the United States has seen health care costs skyrocket for many decades. Something had to be done, so Congress passed the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) in 2010. Apparently, the House suddenly awakened to that fact and wanted to shut down the government to reverse history to when George W. Bush was president.

  • Posted on Friday, October 25, 2013
    By Kay Tillow | Single Payer News
    On October 17, 2013, the Executive Council of the New Mexico Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, endorsed H.R. 676, national single-payer health care legislation sponsored by Congressman John Conyers (D-Mich.), reports Jon Hendry, president.

  • Posted on Monday, October 21, 2013
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D. | Green Shadow Cabinet
    The foundation of the ACA, the mandate that uninsured individuals purchase private insurance if they do not qualify for public insurance, begins in 2014 and the state health insurance exchanges where people can purchase that insurance opened on October 1.

  • Posted on Monday, October 21, 2013
    By Antonia Maioni | The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    Despite the partisan war in Washington that shut down the federal government this week, President Barack Obama has succeeded in implementing the first major health reform in the United States in nearly 50 years, as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act goes into effect. Even though its most virulent critics raise the spectre of “Canadian-style” health care, “Obamacare” does little to change the enduring differences between the two health care system.

  • Posted on Friday, October 18, 2013
    By Phil Kadner | Southtown Star (Chicago)
    Obamacare became what it is today because of both political parties and pressure from the health insurance industry, the pharmaceutical manufacturers and the public.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2013
    By Dr. Philip Caper | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    The lead story in the Oct. 13 New York Times details the ongoing problems of the Affordable Care Act’s websites intended to facilitate access by individuals to the law’s hallmark online health insurance marketplaces. Those problems continue.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2013
    By Elizabeth R. Rosenthal, M.D. | The New York Times
    Your excellent article about the soaring costs of prescription drugs reveals how successful Big Pharma has been in protecting its bottom line even if it leaves millions gasping for breath because they cannot afford their asthma medicine. Through its tremendous lobbying power, this consistently profitable industry has punished American consumers with drug prices way above those of any other country.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2013
    By Ben Joravsky | The Reader (Chicago)
    In his long and distinguished career as an activist and doctor, Quentin Young has fought to integrate the medical staff at Cook County Hospital, treated the wounds of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and infuriated Mayor Rahm Emanuel by thwarting his attempt to waste taxpayer dollars on Wrigley Field.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2013
    By Ed Weisbart, M.D. | St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    We should all celebrate the victory of the United Mine Workers of America in their struggle to retain their earned right to retiree health care ("Peabody strikes deal," Oct. 11).

  • Posted on Monday, October 14, 2013
    By Peter Frost | Chicago Tribune
    Adam Weldzius, a nurse practitioner, considers himself better informed than most when it comes to the inner workings of health insurance. But even he wasn't prepared for the pocketbook hit he'll face next year under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.

  • Posted on Monday, October 14, 2013
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D. | Al-Jazeera
    I suspect this manufactured confusion may sort itself out over time as more people discover that having health insurance in the US doesn’t guarantee access to necessary care. In the meantime, I will try to cut through the spin and hyperbole to explain why the ACA is not a step in the right direction and what health care would look like if we implemented a publicly-financed “Medicare for All.”

  • Posted on Friday, October 11, 2013
    By the Editorial Board | Inside Tucson Business
    There is a solution out there that could be good for the country, good for Americans and good for American business.And that’s single payer insurance.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 10, 2013
    By Adam Gaffney, M.D. | Salon
    The battle for universal healthcare is not over. This is not because of the reason you might suspect – that Republicans will obstinately endeavor to obstruct Obamacare in every way they can (though that seems to be the case).

  • Posted on Thursday, October 10, 2013
    By Amy Goodman | Truthdig
    “We apologize for the inconvenience. The Marketplace is currently undergoing regularly scheduled maintenance and will be back up Monday 10/7/3013.” You read it right, 3013. That was the message on the homepage of the New York state health insurance exchange website this past weekend.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 10, 2013
    By Garrett Adams, M.D., M.P.H. The United States has the greatest wealth gap of all industrialized countries and the gap is surging. We also have the worst health and societal outcomes.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2013
    By Paige Lavender & Nick Wing | Huffington Post
    Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius was grilled by Jon Stewart on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" on Monday, where she appeared to address glitches that have plagued the Obamacare website in its first week since going online.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2013
    By Scott McLarty | CommonDreams
    Sure, the government shutdown and Republican demands regarding the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are reprehensible, but let's not delude ourselves about the ACA itself.

  • Posted on Monday, October 7, 2013
    By Joseph Jarvis, M.D. | Deseret News (Salt Lake City)
    I agree with Dan Liljenquist that the cost of Obamacare has been grossly underestimated ("Obamacare will lead to single-payer health care," Sept. 26). It is also likely that many more employees than originally predicted by the smoke and mirrors estimates offered at the time of passage of the Affordable Care Act will lose their employment-based health benefits, thus the now increasingly strident opposition of organized labor to the implementation of this legislation.

  • Posted on Monday, October 7, 2013
  • Posted on Thursday, October 3, 2013
    By Steffie Woolhandler, M.D. | "To the Point," KCRW – PRI radio
    Let’s be clear. The Affordable Care Act is going to leave 31 million people uninsured, and even if the Red state governors had never stepped in, even if the Supreme Court had never stepped in, Obamacare as written was designed to leave 25 million people uninsured.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 2, 2013
    By Scott Tucker | Truthdig
    The right-wing assault on Obamacare is a distraction, but the “progressive” (or rather party line) defense of the Affordable Care Act is also a dead end. While the tea party and MoveOn descend to mud wrestling, Dr. Don McCanne of Physicians for a National Health Program is not just staking out the moral high ground in the debate on health care.

  • Posted on Friday, September 27, 2013
    By David Himmelstein and Steffie Woolhandler | The New York Times, Room for Debate
    The Department of Health and Human Services' breathless report touts the 53 choices and low premiums available through the new health insurance exchanges. But citizens of other developed nations would laugh at this definition of choice, and the rosy rate quotes hide nasty news for those who aren’t forever young.

  • Posted on Friday, September 27, 2013
    By Trudy Lieberman | Columbia Journalism Review
    What journos need to tell the public about signing up.

  • Posted on Friday, September 27, 2013
    By Ralph Nader | Counterpunch
    Freshman Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who somehow got through Princeton and Harvard Law School, is the best news the defaulting Democratic Party has had in years.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 25, 2013
    By Ed Weisbart, M.D.
    Some of my colleagues have asked me why a physician organization would be participating in a labor rally. Let me explain this.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 25, 2013
    By Matt Miller | The Washington Post
    When you’re being forced to endure another rabid Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) soliloquy on Obamacare’s threat to human freedom, it’s easy to forget how absurd our health-care debate seems to the rest of the civilized world. That’s why it’s bracing to check in with red-blooded, high testosterone capitalists north of the border in Canada — business leaders who love Canada’s single-payer system (a regime far to the “left” of Obamacare) and see it as perfectly consistent with free market capitalism.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2013
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    I have great admiration for the political courage of President Barack Obama and the congressional leaders who were willing to take on health care reform, justifiably called the “third rail” of American politics. Our system cries out for reform. But they made a fatal mistake in allowing the law to be drafted by Congress, which is composed of 535 members with vastly varying values, goals and interests.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 12, 2013
    By Kay Tillow | Single Payer News
    The just-concluded AFL-CIO convention in Los Angeles reaffirmed its commitment to a single-payer health care system while demanding that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) be fixed to protect Taft-Hartley (multi-employer) plans, to end the excise tax, to make employers cover workers who average 20 hours a week, to require construction companies with five or more employees to provide health care, to penalize companies who dump their workers onto Medicaid, plus more.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 11, 2013
    By Sen. Bernie Sanders | The Hill
    It is simply unconscionable that the most advanced nation in the world has so many people who lack health insurance. It makes no sense that millions more are one diagnosis or car accident away from financial disaster. And, despite the trillions of dollars we spend on healthcare, the disparity in the quality of care between the rich and everyone else grows wider.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 11, 2013
    By Michael Hiltzik | Los Angeles Times
    "There isn't a popular groundswell yet" for a single-payer plan "because most people haven't seen the ACA at work in detail yet," says David Himmelstein, a professor of public health at the City University of New York and co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program, the leading advocacy group for single-payer healthcare. But he anticipates that discontent will start in October "and accelerate through the winter."

  • Posted on Monday, September 9, 2013
    By Sarah Kliff and Lena H. Sun | Washington Post
    Every month, a hundred or so people crowd the lobby of the Arlington Free Clinic, clutching blue tickets to enter a health-care lottery. Uninsured and ailing, they hope to be among the two dozen who hit the jackpot and are given free care.

  • Posted on Friday, September 6, 2013
    By Adam Gaffney. M.D. | Salon
    Conservatives like to trumpet 'consumer-driven' health care plans. Here’s what they’re not telling you about them.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 4, 2013
    By Marc Landry | News and Observer (Raleigh, N.C.)
    With the imminent rollout of open enrollment under Obamacare, we are all going to read and hear a great deal about health care and health insurance in the weeks and months to come.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 3, 2013
    By Steve Early | The Huffington Post
    Like many labor negotiators, I looked to health care reform for legislative relief from endless haggling with management over employee benefit costs. My own union and others worked hard for passage of President Obama's Affordable Care Act (ACA) three years ago. Despite its failure to take health insurance issues off the bargaining table, as a more preferable Medicare-for-All system would do, Obamacare was widely cheered by labor.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 28, 2013
    By Caroline Poplin, M.D. | McClatchy-Tribune News Service
    Any program as large and complex as Obamacare (not to mention one facing such entrenched opposition) is going to encounter some turbulence on its shakedown cruise. But the recent glitches are as important for what they tell us about reform, as for what they do.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 27, 2013
    By Tricia Romano | The Daily Beast
    When Breaking Bad first aired on AMC in January 2008, the country wasn’t yet in a recession and Obamacare wasn’t a word, but the health-care debate was front and center.

  • Posted on Monday, August 26, 2013
    By Jay Hancock and Julie Appleby | Kaiser Health News
    Consumer Reports calls it “junk health insurance.” A California regulator described them as “skeleton policies.” To an expert from the American Cancer Society, they “are a perfect example of why health care reform is so crucial.”

  • Posted on Friday, August 23, 2013
    By Gerald Friedman | Center for Popular Economics blog
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was adopted in 2010, but many provisions are only being phased in over several years.

  • Posted on Friday, August 23, 2013
    By Deborah Burger, R.N. | CommonDreams
    Let’s talk about healthcare. I don’t mean debating the Affordable Care Act. I mean healthcare, as in: If everyone needs healthcare, guarantee that everybody gets it.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2013
    By Victoria Powell, MS3 | Short White Coat, Inc., blog
    The Surgery Center of Oklahoma has been in the spotlight recently because of its decision to post all of its prices for its procedures online. This has been heralded as increasing transparency in healthcare costs and implicitly demonizes other hospitals in the area that haven’t followed suit, like traditional academic centers.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2013
    By Jack Bernard | The Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader
    While hospitals in Missouri are having their reimbursement cut under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), “red’’ leaning states are still trying to figure out whether or not to fully implement the law.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013
    By Jack Bernard | The Star-Ledger (Newark, NJ)
    As stated in various newspaper articles, there is a national concern with hospital billings. Specifically, charges vary tremendously from facility to facility for the same services and procedures, as shown by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services data that was released in May 2013.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013
    By Jonathon Ross, M.D. | Canadian Healthcare Network
    Many American physicians, myself included, support single-payer national health insurance, with global budgets for hospital care. A single, publicly accountable payer, coupled with global hospital budgets, are tools needed to assure cost control in health care systems.

  • Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    For the next few months we’ll be bombarded by messages from the Obama administration urging people, especially young, healthy people, to sign up for insurance provided under the Affordable Care Act. Without them, premiums for that insurance will soon climb to unaffordable levels.

  • Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013
    By Adam Gaffney | Salon
    What would a gold-plated Cadillac health care plan look like to you? By the sound of it, you might think it’d cover such superfluities as annual trips to Swiss medical spas, cosmetic surgery on demand and weekly thermal seaweed wraps.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013
    By John McDonough | Boston Globe
    Fine story in today's Globe by Liz Kowalczyk on the new state health data report showing, once again, the dominant economic power of Partners Healthcare in our health market. One beef -- if you read you the story, you would have assumed that the annual report from the State's Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) was all about Partners. There is much more -- go see for yourself. and congrats to CHIA for an excellent report.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 14, 2013
    By Lynn Moses Yellott | The Journal (Martinsburg, W.Va.)
    My husband, family physician Dr. Chess Yellott, and I celebrated Medicare's 48th birthday on Capitol Hill, attending a congressional briefing by Dr. Gerald Friedman, University of Massachusetts professor of economics. Friedman showed how the U.S. could save enough -- $592 billion in the first year alone -- to provide health care for all and eliminate premiums, co-pays, and deductibles by expanding Medicare to everyone. Financing would be entirely tax-based, and 95 percent of us would pay lower taxes for our health care than we now pay in premiums and out of pocket expenses.

  • Posted on Wednesday, August 14, 2013
    By Dan Carpenter | Indianapolis Star
    Republicans and their media allies may be feeling heightened urgency as they saddle up Obama-Scare for 2014, according to a guy who has his own reasons for dissatisfaction with the Affordable Care Act.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 13, 2013
    By Julie Pease, M.D. | Sun Journal (Lewiston, Maine)
    In recent months, the people of Maine have witnessed activity by many different players in the health care system as Maine moves to implement the Affordable Care Act.

  • Posted on Monday, August 12, 2013
    By Joshua Freeman, M.D. | Medicine and Social Justice blog
    The New York Times has been running a series of articles on the cost of health care, which presumably have engendered anger and frustration in many, if not most, readers.

  • Posted on Monday, August 12, 2013
    By Ethan Parke | Solutions
    In 1998, Dr. Deb Richter began, almost single handedly, to revive the dream of universal health care in the United States — open to all and paid for by the government. A primary care physician from Buffalo, New York, Richter had become outraged by the barriers to accessing quality health care in the city’s low-income communities.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 6, 2013
    By Dr. Judith Dasovich | Springfield (MO) News-Leader
    Employee-sponsored health insurance, or ESI, should be replaced with an affordable, efficient financing system.

  • Posted on Tuesday, August 6, 2013
    By Adam Gaffney | Salon
    Until recently, the high-deductible health insurance plan – pay less up front, and more when you get sick – was something of a novelty product, marketed to the young and healthy. Now, however, high-deductibles are rapidly going mainstream – whether for young or old, professionals or poor alike.

  • Posted on Sunday, August 4, 2013
    By Kate Taylor | The New York Times
    Cities and towns across the country are pushing municipal unions to accept cheaper health benefits in anticipation of a component of the Affordable Care Act that will tax expensive plans starting in 2018.

  • Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013
    By Lara Seligman | The Hill
    Expanding the nation’s Medicare program to cover people of all ages would save the government billions of dollars, according to a new study released Wednesday.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2013
    By Public Citizen (news release)
    WASHINGTON – To mark the 48th anniversary of Medicare, congressional lawmakers and consumer advocates today called for Medicare to be expanded to provide health insurance to all Americans and highlighted a new study showing that a Medicare-for-all, or single-payer, system would save enough money to cover all of the 44 to 50 million uninsured Americans.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2013
    By Bob Herman | Becker's Hospital Review
    A new study shows that expanding Medicare to every American citizen would not only achieve universal coverage and trillions in savings, but it's also feasible to implement based on legislation that has already been proposed.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2013
    By Rep. John Conyers and Robert Weissman | The Huffington Post
    "We can say this of Medicare: By honoring the fundamental humanity, which is the spirit of democracy, it is a triumph of rightness in America."

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2013
    By Andrew Stein | Vtdigger.org
    Gov. Peter Shumlin put Vermont on a path to creating the nation’s first single payer health care system when he signed Act 48 in 2011. But since then, his administration has made little progress up that mountain, drawing questions and accusations from the far political left and right about the governor’s sincerity.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2013
    By Rob Stone, M.D. | The Herald-Times (Bloomington, Ind.)
    Who is the most popular health insurer in America? Not Anthem Blue Cross. It’s Medicare. And what insurer is the most efficient? Medicare again, operating at only 1.4 percent overhead, while the private insurers strain to meet the Affordable Care Act maximum overhead of 20 percent.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2013
    By Rep. John Conyers Jr. | The Hill
    As I reflect on my 48 years in Congress, at the positive policies created and those that have had not so positive effects, the enactment of Medicare is a bold highlight.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2013
    By Jessica Schorr Saxe, M.D. | The Charlotte (N.C.) Observer
    Just after her 65th birthday, a patient limped into my office and apologized for not having shown up in months. She had not been able to afford a visit. Now on Medicare, she was able to address her medical problems.

  • Posted on Saturday, July 27, 2013
    By Arnold Relman | New York Review of Books
    The US health care system urgently needs fixing. It is much too expensive and inefficient, and leaves too many people with no care or inadequate care.

  • Posted on Friday, July 26, 2013
    By Elizabeth R. Rosenthal, M.D. | The Journal News (Westchester, N.Y.)
    The 48th birthday of Medicare on Tuesday reminds us that the birth of the Affordable Care Act has not and will not fix our broken health-care system.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 24, 2013
    By Christopher Stack, M.D. | Indianapolis Star
    The basic principles of the free market (transparency, price competition, open access, informed consumers, etc.) do not and cannot exist in health care. Every other industrialized nation has already figured that out.

  • Posted on Monday, July 22, 2013
    By Kay Tillow | Single Payer News
    The Executive Board of the New York City Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, unanimously approved a resolution supporting H.R. 676, national single-payer health care legislation, sponsored by Congressman John Conyers Jr., D-Mich.

  • Posted on Monday, July 22, 2013
    By Robert Kuttner | The Boston Globe
    The cost of Medicare, the top driver of runaway entitlement outlays, seems to be stabilizing at last. For the past three years, Medicare inflation has moderated to an annual average of 3.9 percent. But if you look more deeply, a lot of these supposed savings are actually a shift in costs to patients.

  • Posted on Monday, July 22, 2013
    By Rich Smith | The Motley Fool
    But could it be that the ACA isn't really needed at all? Could an alternative idea -- "Medicare for all" -- actually do a better job of controlling medical costs, and making health care affordable for Americans?

  • Posted on Monday, July 22, 2013
    By Philip Caper, M.D. | Bangor (Maine) Daily News
    Earlier this month, the Obama administration announced a delay in the requirement that many employers offer health insurance to their employees or pay a hefty fine, a key part of Obamacare, the federal health care reform legislation. This was greeted (with glee) by many who oppose the law as a sign that it is beginning to unravel.

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 17, 2013
    Healthcare-NOW
    CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Having suffered an earlier rejection by the leadership of TIAA-CREF of a shareholders resolution calling on the huge, nonprofit investment company to divest its funds from private health insurance firms because of the latter’s “unethical behavior,” a spokesperson for the divestment group took the microphone at the organization’s annual meeting Tuesday and urged just such a course of action.

  • Posted on Monday, July 15, 2013
    By Laurence S. Jacobs, M.D. | Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, N.Y.)
    On July 30, Medicare will be 48 years old. It covers over 50 million Americans — those over 65 and the disabled.

  • Posted on Monday, July 15, 2013
    By Richard Propp, M.D. | Times Union (Albany, N.Y.)
    At this time of year I usually start thinking about the passage of Medicare in July of 1965. How in the world did President Johnson decide to take on Congress to approve such a huge program for seniors? To sum it up, it was just the right thing to do. Why?

  • Posted on Friday, July 12, 2013
    By Toni Vafi | St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    As promises of the Affordable Care Act continue to wither, the delay of the employer mandate is cause for more disappointment.

  • Posted on Thursday, July 11, 2013
    By Healthcare-NOW's national staff | Healthcare-NOW
    This year, some of our movement's most inspirational organizing has focused on state-level single-payer healthcare legislation. Consequently, our ally Public Citizen released a report today titled "A Road Map to 'Single Payer': How States Can Escape the Clutches of the Private Health Insurance System."

  • Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2013
    By Laura S. Boylan, M.D. | The New York Times
    As medical “cost sharing” (read: “cost shifting”) grows, hidden costs will be revealed, and outrage, already simmering, can be counted on coming to a boil. We need to stop pretending that the rules of the market will provide us with high-quality, high-value health care and join the rest of the developed world with universal health insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, July 9, 2013
    By Diana Wagman | Los Angeles Times
    I was excited when the Affordable Care Act was introduced. I thought it was about time everybody in this country had insurance. I believed it was ridiculous that we're the only wealthy, Western nation without universal care. But the Affordable Care Act is not universal care.