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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest Archives

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    By Tim Gaynor | MSNBC
    A pacemaker and defibrillator fitted to carpenter Douglas Gravagna's failing heart makes even rising from the couch of his Phoenix-valley home a battle. But it is not congestive heart failure that is killing him, he says. It is a decision by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer to stop funding for some organ transplants as the state struggles to reduce a yawning budget deficit.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    Medical Economics
    If Massachusetts’ experience with healthcare reform is any guide, national reform won’t greatly reduce the number of your patients forced into bankruptcy because of their medical bills.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    The following text contains the March 10 testimonies of professor Ellen Oxfeld of Vermont Health Care for All and Dr. Peggy Carey, interim chair of the Vermont chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program, before the Vermont House Committee on Health Care, regarding H.202, “An Act Relating to a Single-Payer and Unified Health System.”

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    By Don McCanne, M.D.
    As the author of a PNHP blog entry in November 2010 on the limitations of the Wyden-Brown amendment, which would move up the date when states could obtain waivers from the federal government to introduce their own state-based health reforms, I'd like to clarify my position.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    By Michelle Roberts, Health reporter | BBC News
    People living in England enjoy better health than Americans, despite less investment in healthcare, research published in the US has revealed.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Joan Brunwasser | OpEdNews.com
    My guest today is Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, professor of medicine at Harvard University and a member of Physicians for a National Health Program.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Christian Nordqvist | Medical News Today
    Since Massachusetts implemented its landmark 2006 legislation which made the purchase of health insurance compulsory, the number of personal bankruptcies associated to medical bills or illness has increased, researchers revealed in American Journal of Medicine. Total medical bankruptcies rose from 7,504 in 2007 to 10,093 in 2009 in the state.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Margaret Flowers | t r u t h o u t
    The president supports state innovation in health care, but vigilance is required to ensure state reforms improve health as we continue to call for national reform.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Dr. Bruce Trigg | Albuquerque Journal
    Today is Human Rights Day at the State Capitol. And today Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino will present Senate Joint Resolution 5 for a state constitutional amendment that will recognize health care as a human right to the first legislative committee to which it has been assigned.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    U.S. News and World Report The percentage of personal bankruptcies caused by medical bills or personal illness has changed only slightly since Massachusetts began requiring people to buy health insurance in 2006, a new study finds.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Jason Millman | The Hill
    An individual mandate has done little to stem the rate of medical bankruptcies in Massachusetts, boding poorly for the federal healthcare reform law enacted almost a year ago, according to a new liberal study.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Kay Lazar | The Boston Globe
    The 2006 Massachusetts law that required nearly everyone to buy health insurance has not significantly staunched residents' pain from medical bankruptcies, according to a new study.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Eryn Brown | Los Angeles Times
    Studying medical bankruptcies in Massachusetts, whose recent healthcare reform was a model for national reform, researchers found that while new insurance rules increased the number of people who had coverage, those rules did not improve coverage -- leaving many still struggling with medical debt.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    By the end of this week, the House HealthCare Committee will vote on a bill that authorizes the building blocks for a future single-payer health care system.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Samuel Metz, M.D. | Portland (Ore.) Alliance
    The private health insurance industry, sacred cow of Democrats and Republicans alike, produces a 40 percent administrative loss. This is not a misprint. Private health insurance financing is 10 – repeat – 10 times more costly than all known single-payer agencies.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    For Dr. Robert Penney, a primary care physician who has practiced in Vermont for 25 years, there isn't any question about the need to reform health care.

  • Posted on Friday, March 4, 2011
    Adam Sullivan | WCAX News
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center's Frank McDougall knows a lot of people who impact the health care industry in New Hampshire and Vermont, and all the way to the White House.

  • Posted on Friday, March 4, 2011
    By Larry Carson | The Baltimore Sun
    The idea of a single-payer health care system was lost in the debate over the much-amended national health care reform1 passed by Congress last year, but three Howard County delegates are co-sponsors of legislation in this year's General Assembly that seeks to bring the idea to fruition in the Free State.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 3, 2011
    By Rose Ann DeMoro | The Huffington Post
    The past two weeks have been a "Where's Waldo" moment for President Obama. He's been largely a bystander while tens of thousands of American workers, joined by students, and community allies, marched in Madison's snow and freezing temperatures, and slept on the floors of the capitol to defend their most fundamental right to freedom of assembly and a collective voice.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 2, 2011
    The following is a slightly edited translation of an interview with Edgar A. Lopez, M.D., F.A.C.S., which was conducted in Spanish by journalist Pablo Castelo of Al Día en América in early February. Dr. Lopez is a member of Physicians for a National Health Program and Kentuckians for Single Payer Health Care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 1, 2011
    Canadian Doctors for Medicare | Press release
    A new report on health care financing demonstrates that the widely repeated concern about the sustainability of public health are is unsubstantiated. Despite comments by Prime Ministers, Premiers, bank presidents and newspaper reporters suggesting that we are in a public health care financing crisis, the facts show that Medicare and public sector health care spending in general has grown little over the last 30 years and shos no signs of rapid future growth. The report, “Neat, Plausible and Wrong”, was released today by Canadian Doctors for Medicare (CDM) and draws on the full range of health care statistics to put the myth to rest.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 1, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | The Center for Public Integrity
    Chances are you’ve never heard of Peter Shumlin, who last month was sworn in as the 81st governor or Vermont. That’s about to change. If Shumlin makes good on a signature campaign promise, he might end up as well-known and beloved in the United States as Tommy Douglas is in Canada.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 1, 2011
    By Charles McMahon | Seacoastonline.com (N.H.)
    While I'll be the first to acknowledge my lack of excitement when asked to cover something related to health care, that doesn't necessarily mean I don't understand and appreciate its importance and the place it has in the news.

  • Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011
    By Steven Cotterill | Letters | The Shepherdstown (W.Va.) Chronicle
    A more centralized healthcare system, which the healthcare reform act of last year didn't even come close to approaching, no more represents the beginnings of socialism than reading Nietzsche turns you into a nihilist. The one does not lead to the other.

  • Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011
    By DR. JULIAN GONZALEZ | Anchorage Daily News
    It seems Gov. Sean Parnell has drunk the tea party Kool-Aid about health care reform in order to be "Republican Fashionable." You would think he would at least consider the health care reform instituted by fellow Republican and former governor Mitt Romney in Massachusetts, a plan not unlike the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). But, that's OK, because only 14 percent of Massachusetts physicians think their state's model would be viable for the rest of the country (Massachusetts Medical Society "Physician Workforce Survey", 2010). However, 66 percent preferred either a single-payer plan or a private-public insurance option.

  • Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011
    Jerry Frankel | Letters | The New York Times
    Any reform that doesn’t offer nonprofit, quality, affordable universal access is inferior and fraught with serious problems, not to mention the complexity and unfairness of for-profit insurance.

  • Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011
    By Mel Huff | VtDigger.com
    Vermonters should be prepared for a campaign by health insurance companies to undermine public support for single-payer health care, an industry whistleblower declared at a Statehouse hearing Thursday.

  • Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011
    By SCOTT E. KINNEY | Foster's Daily Democrat (N.H.)
    Nearly 60 city residents gather in the Levinson Meeting Room of the Portsmouth Public Library Wednesday night to educate themselves on the continued fight for a single-payer health care system.

  • Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011
    Susanne L. King | Letters | Boston Herald
    In response to your editorial “Single-payer fan 'fesses up” (Feb. 23) that suggests a single-payer health care program in our state would bring long wait times, I would point to Canada, which delivers health outcomes as good as ours for half the price per person. The median wait time for cardiac surgery in Ontario is not months, but 16 days. And those patients are not left with bills that lead to medical bankruptcy. As a doctor, I agree with Terry Dougherty in his support for single-payer care.

  • Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011
    By John Flowers | Addison County (Vt.) Independent
    Gov. Peter Shumlin told Porter Medical Center officials on Tuesday to be patient in weathering what he believes will be a short-term financial storm en route to a new, single-payer health care system he said will bring long-term success and financial sustainability to the industry.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011
    By Amy Bartlett | Siuslaw News (Florence, Ore.)
    With a shared passion for health care reform, a group of Northwest physicians, calling themselves “Mad as Hell Doctors,” have been traveling the country to get the word out about changing what they term a “fragmented, broken health care ‘non-system.’”

  • Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011
    Leonard Rodberg, PhD

  • Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011
    By Kyle Cheney | Boston Herald
    A senior Patrick administration health care official said Friday that a single payer system may work more effectively and efficiently than Massachusetts’s existing insurance market, a high-profile endorsement that raised eyebrows at a legislative hearing.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011
    Pharmaceutical companies continue to claim that high research and development (R&D) costs make it necessary for them to charge high prices and retain long ownership of patents to recoup costs. But a new study co-authored by UVic health economist Rebecca Warburton and Donald W. Light of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey demonstrates that high R&D estimates have been constructed by industry-supported economists to support the companies’ claims.

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2011
    The Presbytery of Mid-Kentucky respectfully overtures the 220th General Assembly (2012) to instruct Mission Responsibility Through Investment (MRTI) to report to the General Assembly Mission Council on the corporate practices of Cigna, Aetna, Humana, WellPoint, United Health Care health insurance companies – in particular as such practices compare with and relate to previous General Assembly actions relative to health care. The General Assembly Mission Council is authorized and encouraged to act on this information, and, as it deems appropriate, implement divestment procedures as well as encourage individual Presbyterians and congregations to divest of holdings in the said companies; and, in view of the urgency of the ongoing health care crisis, to take action within six months of the adoption of this recommendation; and to report to the 221st General Assembly (2014) on divestment actions.

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2011
    By Peter Hirschfeld | Times Argus (Barre-Montpelier, Vt.)
    Three weeks after unveiling a draft version of his single-payer health care proposal, Harvard economist William Hsiao returned to the Legislature Friday to submit a final copy that reaches exactly the same conclusion.

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2011
    By Anne Galloway | Vtdigger.com
    Harvard economist William Hsiao told lawmakers a month ago that if they adopted a single payer style health care plan, Vermonters could save $500 million in the first year of implementation.

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | The Burlington Free Press
    The consultants who urged Vermont to move to a single-payer health-care system received 170 comments — complimenting, questioning and criticizing their draft report — but nothing persuaded the researchers to revise their basic recommendation, they told lawmakers Friday.

  • Posted on Friday, February 18, 2011
    Randy E. Barnett | Letter to the Editor | The New York Times
    Congress has many constitutional ways to address the market distortions that are inflating the costs of both health care and health insurance. And, although I would oppose such a program, existing doctrine would allow Congress to impose a “single payer” tax-and-spending scheme like Medicare on everyone.

  • Posted on Friday, February 18, 2011
    Pippa C. Abston, MD, PhD | Letters to the editor | Huntsville Times
    Reducing Medicaid funding would put every pregnant woman and newborn in our state at risk. It doesn't matter how much money you can pay your doctor if that doctor is not around. The same thing could happen to children now able to get care from excellent pediatric subspecialists. Pediatric surgeons, cardiologists, cancer specialists and others rely on 40 percent or more of their income being paid by Medicaid. Without that money, they may not be able to continue caring for children with private insurance either.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 17, 2011
    By James Clark | Health News Florida
    As a former state director of social services (South Carolina), health policy chief in Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and assistant Secretary for programs in the Department of Children and Families, I find the current debate on health care reform has failed to fully inform the general public. The discussions have mentioned the “elephant in the room”: the cost of the current delivery system, and then have gone downhill.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 17, 2011
    From the Office of Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.-I) Section 1332 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – the “Waiver for State Innovation” – allows states to waiver out of some of the requirement of federal health reform if they meet certain standards. The provision in the new law was authored by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and strongly supported by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.).

  • Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2011
    By Jessica Zigmond | ModernHealthcare
    As federal lawmakers continue to debate the constitutionality, financing and implementation of the healthcare reform law, one House Democrat has introduced legislation calling for a universal health insurance program with single-payer financing.

  • Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2011
    The Huffington Post
    Justin Bieber has taken the United States by storm, but if he gets sick, he may find himself retreating back to Canada -- and not just for the home-cooked meals.

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2011
    Commentary from Dr. Ida Hellander, Drs. David Himmelstein and Steffie Woolhandler, and Vermont Health Care for All members Dr. Deb Richter, Ethan Parke, Marilyn Mode, Ellen Oxfeld and Marjorie Power

  • Posted on Monday, February 14, 2011
    By Elaine Hou | Taiwan Today
    Debate has raged for almost a decade over the design of Taiwan’s second-generation National Health Insurance System. The seemingly endless rounds of consultations and negotiations pushed the patience of private and public sector participants to the limit, but their efforts paid handsome dividends Jan. 4 after amendments to the NHI Act passed muster in the Legislature.

  • Posted on Monday, February 14, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | The Huffington Post
    The media had lots of health care news to obsess about last week. A federal judge ruled the health care reform law unconstitutional, and Senate Republicans tried in vain to repeal the law. But most of the press paid virtually no attention to a potentially much more important development -- a multi-pronged effort by five major insurers to strip from the law key regulations and consumer protections that aren't to their liking.

  • Posted on Friday, February 11, 2011
    By James Fieseher, M.D. | Portsmouth (N.H.) Herald
    One of the major reasons that America is the only industrialized nation with a privatized for-profit health-care system is the fact that most Americans don't understand how it works. Most of us believe it's too complicated and doesn't seem to make sense, even though it's the only health care that we have ever known. Perhaps the best way to understand how private (non-government) health care works is to apply the concept to a government run service.

  • Posted on Friday, February 11, 2011
    By Susan Dugan | Washington Park (Colo.) Profile
    Health care activist Roya Brown views health care as a basic human right. Drawn first to Health Care for All Colorado, Brown recently founded Young HCAC, whose mission is to “get young people involved in educating, mobilizing and agitating ... to get mad about what is going on.”

  • Posted on Friday, February 11, 2011
    By Ezra Klein | The Washington Post
    Peter Shumlin, the newly elected governor of Vermont, has a plan for health-care reform: Rather than repeal it, he wants to supercharge it. His state will set up an exchange, and then, as soon as possible, apply for a waiver that allows it to turn the program into a single-payer system. I spoke with Shumlin this morning, and a lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.

  • Posted on Friday, February 11, 2011
    By Josh Hoxie | The Defender
    With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act last spring, those of us graduating in May won’t have to include losing health insurance on our long list of life-altering changes.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2011
    Wendell Potter is the former head of public relations for insurance giant Cigna. In 2009, he became a whistleblower, describing with an insider's knowledge the behavior of the health insurance industry. His book Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR Is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans documents those revelations. Potter spoke to Helen Redmond during a Chicago stop on his national book tour in January.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2011
    Eleven faith-based organizations have passed resolutions in support of HR 676/Medicare for All so far.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    The woman who Gov. Peter Shumlin hired to guide his health reform effort presented lawmakers Tuesday with the administration’s roadmap — an 80-page bill — leading to a consolidated, publicly financed system that would provide medical coverage to all Vermonters.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2011
    By Business insider, Wall St. Cheat Sheet
    The business model of American health insurers is basically: try to get healthy customers as clients, and then resist as long as possible when it comes to paying out claims. That’s actually not an indictment or a criticism. It’s just the way our system works, and it’s screwed up. Whatever you feel about Obamacare, you probably think our current system needs reform in some sense. Below we present the posterboys of the problem. Top healthcare CEOs making millions, leading companies that deny you coverage.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2011
    By Margaret Flowers, MD | YES! Magazine
    Last month, fulfilling a campaign promise, Republicans in the House of Representatives voted to repeal “Obamacare.” The vote was primarily a symbolic gesture. House leadership knows repeal will not survive a vote in the Senate or a Presidential veto. But the Republican leadership is likely to attempt steps that would lead to a de facto repeal of the health law.

  • Posted on Wednesday, February 9, 2011
    By Aimee Miles | Kaiser Health News
    Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, who was elected last November after promising to reform health care in the state, unveiled a bill Tuesday that would abolish most forms of private health insurance and move state residents into a publicly funded insurance pool.

  • Posted on Wednesday, February 9, 2011
    By Claudia Fegan, M.D. | Hyde Park Herald (Chicago)
    Many residents of Hyde Park work for large employers, the University of Chicago being just one example among several. In the wake of the new health law, what benefit changes can workers at these large companies expect to see?

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 8, 2011
  • Posted on Tuesday, February 8, 2011
  • Posted on Tuesday, February 8, 2011
    By DR. RALPH S. BOVARD | Star Tribune
    As a physician, I agree that we must get health care costs down if we're going to achieve universal coverage, but I strongly disagree that the only way to do it is to ration. There is another viable and proven option: a single-payer or regulated multipayer health care system, such as exists in every nation in the Organization for Economic Co-operation & Development except the United States and Mexico.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    Charles Pack | Letter, The New York Times
    It is hard for me to understand why the governors, along with corporate chief executives, aren’t lobbying Congress and President Obama for single-payer health insurance. It would take the burden of providing health insurance off state and corporate budgets and provide the broadest and least expensive health care solution.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By PHILIP CAPER, JOE LENDVAI and JULIE PEASE | The Portland (Maine) Press Herald
    There has been a great deal of discussion recently about health care reform in America and in Maine. Many Republicans want to repeal last year's federal health care reform law, and most Democrats want to implement and improve it. In the meantime, pending full implementation of the law in 2014, health care costs for individuals, employers and the government continue to soar, and the number of uninsured Americans (including Mainers) continues to grow.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By Robert Reich | The Business Insider
    The Republican-led house vote to repeal the new health care law is purely symbolic. But there’s one provision of the law that Republicans are likely to try to defund, and they may have the public with them on this. It’s the so-called “individual mandate” – the requirement that everyone purchase health insurance, or pay a fine. According to a recent poll, 60 percent of the public opposes it. They just don’t like the idea of government telling them they have to buy something.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By Deborah Richter | Burlington Free Press
    Praise has been heaped on the 120-some page report issued by the Harvard health economist, William Hsiao, and his working group. Words like historic, ground-breaking, and masterful are used, and since I entirely agree I will put them to use as well.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By Matt Miller | The Washington Post
    "Good afternoon, I'm Brian Williams reporting from Washington, where it looks like October 26, 2017, will be a day that truly goes down in history. In a few moments, at a table not far from where I now stand, President Hillary Clinton will sign into law the universal health-care legislation - "Medicare for All," as she calls it - that completes a journey Mrs. Clinton began nearly 25 years ago. Back then, as first lady, her attempt to reform the health-care system proved a fiasco that cost Democrats their hold on power. Who would have thought then - or later, when President Barack Obama's big health reform was overturned by the Supreme Court in a controversial 5 to 4 ruling in 2012 - that today's bipartisan bill would be the result? For some perspective on the twists and turns of history, we're joined by NBC's David Gregory. David, health reform seemed dead in the water in 2012. How did we get from that Supreme Court ruling to today?"

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By Mike Hall | AFL-CIO Blog
    Yesterday, some 200 activists, led by the California Nurses Association/National Nurses United (CNA/NNU) rallied outside Blue Shield’s San Francisco corporate headquarters to protest the health insurance giant’s premium hikes of as much as 59 percent for California consumers.

  • Posted on Monday, February 7, 2011
    By Stephan Burklin | MaineWatchdog.org
    A resolve requiring the Legislature to update a single-payer feasibility study is headed for the Insurance and Financial Services Committee on Wednesday.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 3, 2011
    The following remarks were delivered by Dr. Claudia Fegan, past president of Physicians for a National Health Program, to the Louisville (Ky.) Urban League on Jan. 15. 2011

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 1, 2011
    By Greg Sargent | The Washington Post
    We will never know whether the founding generation would have agreed with this concept or not. They didn't agree on much even among themselves. But in Rothman's view, they are already on record supporting government run health care, financed by mandatory taxation. So there!

  • Posted on Tuesday, February 1, 2011
    By Richard Weiskopf, M.D. | Letters | The Post-Standard (Syracuse, N.Y.)
    With all the discussion about health care reform, including Rep. Ann Marie Buerkle’s (R-N.Y.) advocating repeal, I would like to cite three points researched and published (but not publicized enough) by Physicians for a National Health Program, which continues to advocate for national single-payer reform, and of which I am a member.

  • Posted on Monday, January 31, 2011
    The following statement was prepared for the NY Metro chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program and Single Payer New York by Leonard Rodberg, Ph.D, research director of the NY Metro chapter of PNHP, in response to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s call for “Redesigning the Medicaid Program.”

  • Posted on Monday, January 31, 2011
    California Nurses Association | Press Release
    Despite the passage of national health care reform and widespread uproar in California over insurance industry pricing practices and other abuses, California’s largest private insurance companies continue to deny more than one-fourth of all claims, according to new findings released today by the California Nurses Association/National Nurses United.

  • Posted on Friday, January 28, 2011
    By Anne Galloway | VTDigger.com
    Physicians were in attendance at the Statehouse on Thursday. They came dressed in lab coats and scrubs, and stethoscopes dangling around their necks. The ailment they came to cure was the medical system itself: In a rare “house call” to the Capitol, they issued a prescription for Vermont’s byzantine system of insurance and government programs – they called for a single payer health care system.

  • Posted on Friday, January 28, 2011
    By Claudia Fegan, M.D. | The Hyde Park Herald (Chicago)
    Many of Hyde Park's small businesses are doing their budget and tax planning for the year ahead. For some, the issue of health care insurance looms large, either as a current expense or as something they'd like to begin offering their employees.

  • Posted on Friday, January 28, 2011
    Editorial | The Capital Times (Madison, Wis.)
    Americans are divided over the question of how best to reform a dysfunctional health care system. But the new Republican majority in the House entertains no doubt about what must be done: The for-profit insurance industry must be restored to its “proper” place as the decider of who gets care -- and how much they will have to pay.

  • Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2011
    AP/CNBC
    Donning lab coats, Vermont doctors are taking to the halls of the Statehouse to lend their backing to Gov. Peter Shumlin's push for a single-payer health care system.

  • Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2011
  • Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2011
  • Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | The Huffington Post
    If you want to know how things really get done in Washington — or don’t get done, depending on the desires of America’s corporate executives — all you have to do is read a couple of paragraphs in a Jan. 23 Philadelphia Inquirer story.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2011
    By Robert Reich | San Francisco Chronicle
    If the Republican attack is successful, single-payer will be the only alternative. And it's the system Americans seem to prefer - payroll taxes and public insurance.

  • Posted on Monday, January 24, 2011
    By Kevin O’Connor | Times Argus (Barre-Montpelier, Vt.)
    Middlebury’s Dr. Jack Mayer knows that most patients want health care reform to cut rising prices. But he, along with a growing group of Vermont medical providers, hopes to point a scalpel at piles of related paperwork.

  • Posted on Friday, January 21, 2011
    By John Nichols | National Public Radio
    The Americans who oppose repeal but who refuse to buy into the fantasy that the health care system has been sufficiently reformed are right. And there are a lot of them. According to the Associated Press poll, 43 percent of Americans want the government to do more to re-engineer the existing health care system.

  • Posted on Friday, January 21, 2011
    By Russell Mokhiber | Single Payer Action


  • Posted on Thursday, January 20, 2011
    By Peter Hart | Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting
    When I saw the headline (1/19/11), "Vocal Physicians Group Renews Health Law Fight," I thought maybe--just maybe--the New York Times might be talking about Physicians for a National Health Program, the group comprised of "18,000 physicians, medical students and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance." But no. The Times story is about the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, a 3,000-member organization that is on the far right of the healthcare debate, and is garnering coverage now because they support repeal of the new healthcare law.

  • Posted on Wednesday, January 19, 2011
  • Posted on Wednesday, January 19, 2011
    By Rose Ann DeMoro | The Huffington Post
    At a time when so many Americans continue to fall through the gaping holes in our healthcare system, it's hard to imagine a more dysfunctional debate in Washington than the charade this week over the Republican effort to repeal President Obama's healthcare law.

  • Posted on Wednesday, January 19, 2011
    William McQuaid | Letters | Seattle Times
    Single-payer insurance systems have been proven to cost half as much as we spend. These single-payer insurance systems also cover everyone, eliminating bankruptcies. Our own government statistics prove single-payer insurance systems are the best at controlling costs. All of Locke's numbers pale in comparison with the $400 billion we would save each year by simply eliminating the health-insurance middleman.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By Joan Brunwasser | OpEdNews
    The Republican calls to repeal the law are mere political posturing and will not succeed. In fact the health industries, which contributed more heavily to Republican campaigns in the last election cycle than to Democrats, do not want the full law repealed. The Republicans will more likely succeed in defunding portions of the bill and relaxing regulation of the health insurance industry. This will escalate our health care crisis.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By NEAL P. GOSWAMI | Bennington Banner
    Vermont's congressional delegation joined Gov. Peter Shumlin Tuesday to announce legislation that would allow states to seek federal health care waivers in 2014, and the flexibility to craft their own state-level health care plans.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By Michela Tindera | Indiana Daily Student
    More than 415 people filled the Buskirk-Chumley Theater on Sunday as Wendell Potter, former head of corporate communications at health insurance giant CIGNA, attempted to blow the whistle on corporate insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By Terry Doran | VTDigger.com
    When we talk about health care reform, what are we really talking about?

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By Nancy C. Rodriguez | Louisville Courier-Journal
    President Barack Obama’s landmark health care law was significant, “but it is not enough and it will not solve our problem,” a national advocate for single-payer health insurance told an audience Saturday at the Urban League of Louisville.

  • Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    By RICHARD C. DILLIHUNT, M.D. | The Portland (Maine) Press Herald
    Health care costs are devastating the U.S. middle class in ways not seen in countries that have universal care.

  • Posted on Thursday, January 13, 2011
    Clark Newhall, M.D., J.D. | Letters | Ogden Standard-Examiner
    Your Editorial Board has the right idea--'grab control of medicare'--but the exactly wrong method. Instead of raising the age for eligibility for Medicare to 67 as your editorial suggests, we should lower it--to 0. That's right--0. Everyone should be covered by Medicare from birth.

  • Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2011
    By E. FULLER TORREY | The Wall Street Journal
    The solution to this situation is obvious—make sure individuals with serious mental illnesses are receiving treatment. The mistake was not in emptying the nation's hospitals but rather in ignoring the treatment needs of the patients being released. Many such patients will take medication voluntarily if it is made available to them. Others are unaware they are sick and should be required by law to receive assisted outpatient treatment, including medication and counseling, as is the case in New York under Kendra's Law. If they do not comply with the court-ordered treatment plan, they can and should be involuntarily admitted to a hospital. Arizona has such a provision in its laws, but it is almost never used.

  • Posted on Monday, January 10, 2011
    By Sarah Goodell, M.A. and Katherine Swartz, Ph.D. | The Synthesis Project
    This brief examines how cost-sharing affects the use of services, whether some patients are more sensitive to cost-sharing than others, and whether reduced use of services as a result of cost-sharing has an effect on health outcomes. All of these issues factor into whether and how cost-sharing could be used to reduce the rate of growth of health care spending.

  • Posted on Monday, January 10, 2011
    By JOHNATHON ROSS | The Blade (Toledo, Ohio)
    The American health care system is severely dysfunctional. We spend about twice as much per person on health care as other wealthy democracies, yet our medical outcomes are mediocre by comparison. Some 45,000 Americans a year die because they lack health insurance. Thousands more needlessly suffer and die from preventable causes. Others go bankrupt because of medical bills.

  • Posted on Monday, January 10, 2011
    Benjamin Day | Letters | The Boston Globe
    On last Sunday’s editorial page, the Globe supports two courses toward controlling health care costs: It backs Governor Patrick’s efforts to change the health care industry’s fee-for-service system to “global payments," and it suggests that Vermont’s plan to implement a single-payer health care system should be supported as an experiment, or “a laboratory of democracy."

  • Posted on Monday, January 10, 2011

    Simeon Kimmel | Letters | The Boston Globe
    I applaud The Globe for showcasing Vermont’s single-payer “laboratory’’ in its Jan. 2 editorial “Vermont: Creating a singular health system.’’ As a third-year medical student at Cambridge Health Alliance, I’ve found that it doesn’t take long to see that the current system is insufficient.