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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest Archives

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009
    Amy Goodman | Democracy Now
    On Veterans Day, a new study estimates four times as many US Army veterans died last year because they lacked health insurance than the total number of US soldiers who were killed in Iraq and Afghanistan in the same period. A research team at Harvard Medical School says 2,266 veterans under the age of 65 died in 2008 because they were uninsured. We speak to the report's co-author, Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, professor of medicine at Harvard University and co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009
    By Viji Sundaram | New America Media
    Lack of health insurance claimed the lives of more than 2,266 veterans under the age of 65 last year, says a Harvard Medical School study out today. That number is more than 14 times the number of deaths (155) suffered by U.S. troops in Afghanistan in 2008, and twice as many (911 as of Oct. 31) as have died since the war began in 2003.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009
    Of all the torrent of words that followed House passage of its version of healthcare reform legislation in early November, perhaps the most misleading were those comparing it to enactment of Social Security and Medicare.

  • Posted on Monday, November 9, 2009
    By Marcia Angell, M.D. | The Huffington Post
    Well, the House health reform bill -- known to Republicans as the Government Takeover -- finally passed after one of Congress's longer, less enlightening debates. Two stalwarts of the single-payer movement split their votes; John Conyers voted for it; Dennis Kucinich against. Kucinich was right.

  • Posted on Monday, November 9, 2009
    Medical News Today
    On the eve of what would have been the first national vote on single-payer legislation Rep. Anthony Weiner's single-payer/Medicare for all amendment was withdrawn Friday, November 6.

  • Posted on Monday, November 9, 2009
    By Patti Singer | Rochester (N.Y.) Democrat And Chronicle
    The day before the much-anticipated vote on health care reform in the House of Representatives, Eric Massa, D-Corning, said that the Affordable Health Care for America Act gives too much to the insurance industry, doesn't do enough to control costs, and he can't support it.

  • Posted on Monday, November 9, 2009
    Dr. Carol A. Paris | Letter to the Editor | South Maryland Newspapers
    In the spirit of full disclosure, I support a single-payer national health program. That said, my comments are focused on HR 3962, the Affordable Health Care for America Act. I agree with Wendell Potter, the former head of public relations for CIGNA, that this legislation could more accurately be titled "The Private Health Insurance Profit Protection and Enhancement Act."

  • Posted on Monday, November 9, 2009
    By Donna Smith
    So, I wake this morning to see that Speaker Pelosi lied again about why she just could not allow a single-payer amendment to survive the legislative effort in the House on healthcare reform.

  • Posted on Friday, November 6, 2009
    By Rhonda Swan | Palm Beach Post
    Perhaps "death panels" weren't such a bad idea. For private health insurance companies. If ever there was a useless entity, it's a business that earns profits for doing nothing.

  • Posted on Friday, November 6, 2009
    By David M. Herszenhorn | New York Times | Prescriptions Blog
    Representative Anthony D. Weiner, Democrat of New York, a fierce champion in Congress of a single-payer health system that would be fully run by the government, said Friday that he had agreed not to insist on a vote on that issue, in an effort to help Democratic leaders pass their plan.

  • Posted on Friday, November 6, 2009
    By Dr. Michael T. Rey | Asheville (N.C.) Citizen-Times
    This country needs radical reform to fix a health care system that currently encourages poor-quality medical care and costs too much. A universal single-payer system would put the focus back on patient care, where it belongs, and reduce costs.

  • Posted on Friday, November 6, 2009
    Dr. Ellen Kaczmarek | Letter to the Editor | Asheville (N.C.) Citizen-Times
    A heartfelt public "thank you" to Dr. Michael Rey for his guest commentary, "ER doctor analyzes health reform debate," (AC-T, Oct. 23). He echoed my sentiments exactly, and as a practicing primary care physician, I strongly second his desire for a universal single-payer health care system.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 5, 2009
    By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF | Op-Ed Columnist | New York Times


  • Posted on Wednesday, November 4, 2009
    By Samuel Metz | The Oregonian
    Our health insurance industry succeeds as well in this century as the tobacco industry did in the last. Witness the congressional "reforms" -- all variants on a theme: Make every citizen buy our insurance. And if our price is too high, make our government buy it for them. All hail this great victory for free enterprise. But what about our health?

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 4, 2009
    By Shari Roan | Los Angeles Times Blog
    An analysis of 23 million hospital records from 37 states shows that a lack of health insurance likely played a role in the deaths of nearly 17,000 U.S. children over a 17-year period.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 3, 2009
    Medical News Today
    The American Medical Student Association (AMSA) urges Speaker Nancy Pelosi to keep her promise and allow a vote on a single payer substitution amendment to the House health care reform bill, to be introduced by Representative Anthony Weiner [D-NY].

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 3, 2009
    Kaiser Daily Health Policy Report
    Coverage numbers regarding the Democrats' legislative push "for a government insurance plan to compete with private carriers are finally in: Two percent. That's the estimated share of Americans younger than 65 who'd sign up for the public option plan.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 3, 2009
    By Kay Tillow | The Hill
    We are in danger of losing the opportunity to bring Improved Medicare for All, a single payer plan, before the Congress. Last July Congressman Anthony Weiner and six of his colleagues on the Energy and Commerce Committee attempted to substitute the real public option--HR 676, a single payer plan--for the healthcare reform in the House. Speaker Nancy Pelosi assured them that if they withdrew the amendment in committee they would have an opportunity to bring it to the House floor for a debate and vote. Now Pelosi is threatening to keep the Weiner Single Payer Amendment from seeing the light of day.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 3, 2009
    By Catherine Nessa | American College of Physicians Medical Student Newsletter
    On any given weekend during the fall of 2004, Andy Coates was never where you might expect--he wasn’t at home with his children or outside working in the yard. He wasn’t at a restaurant having dinner with his wife or at the ballgame with his buddies. He wasn’t at a party thrown by neighbors or friends, or even on a beach chair on vacation. Instead, Andy Coates spent his weekends at Columbia Memorial Hospital in Hudson, NY, with the barest of accommodations: meals were brought in by cooler, his bed was a cot in a room in a recently-closed nursing home across the street from the hospital, and for entertainment, he had his work. For many physicians such an arrangement might be unappealing, but it was perfect for Dr. Coates, who has found satisfaction and fulfillment in unexpected places by taking roads less traveled.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 3, 2009
    By Anne Underwood | New York Times | Prescriptions blog
    William Hsiao is a professor of economics at the Harvard School of Public Health and co-author of the 2004 book “Getting Health Reform Right.” He served as a health care adviser to the Taiwan government in the 1990s, when officials decided to reform that country’s health care system and to introduce universal coverage. He spoke with Anne Underwood, a freelance writer.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 29, 2009
    By SHARMINA MANANDHAR | Southern Maryland Online
    Four protesters, including two doctors, were arrested at a "single-payer health care plan" sit-in at the CareFirst insurance company office in Baltimore Thursday.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 29, 2009
    By Henry S. Kahn, MD
    No knock. Needed
    Perhaps a chance to talk
    With the doctor
    Would be nice.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 29, 2009
    From Mobilization for Health Care for All
    The Mobilization for Health Care for All continues to see a growing number of doctors participating in these actions. Yesterday Dr. Margaret Flowers, a pediatrician who has testified before Congress on the need for meaningful health care reform, was arrested in Baltimore and joined by Dr. Eric Naumberg, also a physician.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 28, 2009
    Joseph S. Ross, MD, MHS; Allan S. Detsky, MD, PhD | JAMA
    ...Government-sponsored plans like Canada's are frequently publicly portrayed as limiting choice. However, there is clear evidence that for Canada's health care system, less choice in insurance coverage (although guaranteed) has not resulted in less choice of hospitals, physicians, and diagnostic testing and treatments compared with the United States. In fact, there is arguably more choice.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 28, 2009
    By DANIEL BARLOW | Times-Argus (Vt.)
    U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders will likely make history this year when -- for the first time ever -- he brings a bill creating a national single-payer health care system to the floor of the Senate for a vote.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 28, 2009
    By Kevin Gosztola | OpEd News
    At least three doctors will be risking arrest in civil disobedience actions during Mobilization for Health care for All's third wave of actions this week, which are being held to demand an end to insurance abuse and to demand real health care reform for all.

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Steve Early & Rand Wilson | The Nation
    In every other advanced industrial nation, the contentious issue of who pays for medical care was taken off the bargaining table long ago. And no worker would ever lose his or her life defending job-based private health insurance.

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Kyle Chene | Belmont (Mass.) Citizen-Herald
    Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, a Harvard University professor and advocate with Physicians for a National Health Program, questioned a 97.4 percent health insurance rate in Massachusetts, a figure highly touted by the Patrick administration.

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Donna Smith | CommonDreams.org
    Why does H1N1 call for a Presidential designation as a national emergency while the preventable deaths of 45,000 Americans every year (122 every day) is not?

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Roni Caryn Rabin | New York Times | Prescriptions Blog
    Americans without health insurance are less likely to know if they have diabetes or high cholesterol than those with coverage, and they’re less likely to keep their high blood pressure under control than the insured, a new study reports.

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    by Leonard Rodberg | Tikkun Magazine
    President Obama's health reform plan is in trouble. Public support for it is only lukewarm; both Left and Right oppose it. Pundits and editorial writers complain that Obama has turned the issue over to Congress, or that he hasn't explained the plan well enough. He and his staff have been working closely with many members of Congress from the very beginning, and he has described his plan repeatedly and in many forums -- and no one questions that he is a superb communicator. And yet disquiet and confusion persist. What has gone wrong?

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Aaron E. Carroll | Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine | The Huffington Post
    We’re so close to health care reform! Even Paul Krugman is starting to talk about what comes next. Me? I’ve been thinking about what comes next for a long time. I think this bill will pass. We will get the incremental reforms we were promised. Things will likely get better in the short term. Then, since we didn’t contain costs, we’ll need to enact real reform. Or, things will go right back to the status quo.

  • Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009
    By Don R. McCanne | International Journal of Health Services | Volume 39, Number 4 / 2009
    Among OECD nations, the United States is an outlier in having the highest per capita health care costs in a system that unnecessarily exposes many individuals to financial hardship, physical suffering, and even death. President Obama and Congress are currently involved in a process to reform the flawed health care system. The OECD has contributed to that process by releasing a paper, "Health Care Reform in the United States," which describes some of the problems that must be addressed, but then provides proposed solutions that omit consideration of a more equitable and efficient universal public insurance program. The same omission is taking place in Washington, DC. By reinforcing proposals that support the private insurance industry, the source of much of [he waste and inequities in health care, the authors of the OECD paper have failed in their responsibility to inform on policies rather than politics.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009
    By Joseph Shapiro | NPR
    It's dangerous enough to deal with a chronic illness like diabetes or cholesterol. But Americans who don't have health insurance often have these conditions and don't even know it.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 20, 2009
    By Patricia C. McCarter | Huntsville Times
    Asked how many people knew someone who had died because they couldn't afford medical care, five of the 70 people at the Health Care is a Human Right physicians panel discussion stood up.

  • Posted on Monday, October 19, 2009
    By Elizabeth Cooney | Boston Globe
    Uninsured people are also more likely to have undiagnosed and undertreated medical conditions, according to a new study comparing chronic illnesses among Americans with and without health coverage. The results offer possible clues to a recently reported higher death rate among people who lack insurance.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 18, 2009
    By Clyde Winter | Hearts and Minds Blog
    All of the grassroots efforts for the substantive, effective health care reform that is so needed by American families, have been attacked -- for months, for years, and for decades -- by insurance corporations, their corporate allies, and now the crass strategists within both major political parties. A health care crisis has thus materialized and been getting worse fast.

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By BRIAN NEARING | Times Union
    Since being diagnosed with chronic kidney disease six years ago, Stephanie Agurkis has not been able to get health insurance. "I'm paying for treatments myself," said the 29-year-old nursing student and part-time farm stand worker from Ithaca. "And every year that goes by, I am more and more in debt."

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By Leonard Rodberg
    Progressives worry that, if President Obama's health reform plan (the "Plan") fails to pass, a latter-day right-wing Gingrich movement will take over the Congress in 2010 and the White House in 2012. What I have not heard, but what I am increasingly coming to believe, is that if the Plan passes in any of its current forms, things will go just as badly for him. Why is that?

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee
    The nation's largest organization of registered nurses today condemned the latest campaign by the insurance industry, threatening massive increases in premium rates if it does not get its way on the healthcare bills currently before Congress.

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By Joe Jarvis, MD | Deseret News
    I first heard the term lemon socialism articulated by Simon Johnson, who is the former Chief Economist at the International Monetary Fund, now at M.I.T.'s Sloan School of Management. He defines lemon socialism as a system wherein financial successes are credited to the private sector, while their failures are transferred to the taxpayers through bailouts. Anyone who has paid attention to our nation’s financial woes recognizes how lemon socialism is a most apt description of the American economy.

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By Pippa Abston, MD, PhD and Huntsville-area physicians. | Huntsville Times
    We are your doctors, and we are frustrated. Frustrated over endless insurance paperwork and denials of coverage. Frustrated that our patients can't choose their own doctors because of insurance restrictions; frustrated when our patients lose their insurance coverage and can't afford medical care.

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By Tim Louis Macaluso | City Newspaper
    But wild-eyed fights over health care are nothing new in American politics. The struggle for universal coverage has been going on for more than 100 years, says Theodore Brown, a history professor at the University of Rochester. Brown has chronicled the history of health care in the US. He describes it as a long series of charge-and-retreat scuffles between liberals and conservatives that have led us to where we are now - with a costly, broken system.

  • Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009
    By Stephanie Smith | CNN
    "I don't think I could bear to listen to those words again. ... 'You have cancer,' " Elder said. "I've said to my husband, if I start to get sick, just set me up with a nice pill cocktail on a beach, because nobody cares. That's the message you hear every day from insurance companies."

  • Posted on Thursday, October 8, 2009
    By Dr. Taro J. Adachi | Letters | The Baltimore Sun
    The 2009 Kaiser Family Foundation's annual survey of health benefits notes that despite these hard economic times and the focus on health insurance costs, the average annual premiums for employer sponsored health insurance are $4,824 for single coverage and $13,375 for family coverage -- a 5 percent increase from last year alone. Workers contributions, annual deductibles and copays all went up.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 8, 2009
    Mobilization for Health Care for All
    Seven citizens and health care providers who are fed up with the state of our health care and the health care debate were arrest at the downtown offices of Cigna today. The sit-in is part of a national mobilization to end insurance abuse and build support for real reform - Medicare for All, a single-payer plan.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 7, 2009
    By John Geyman | The Huffington Post
    Americans are dying at a faster rate -- 1 every 12 minutes, 5 an hour, 120 a day, 45,000 a year -- not from war or natural disaster, but from lack of health insurance.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 7, 2009
    Bu Aaron Roland, M.D. | DailyKos
    About three weeks ago a thirty year old patient whom I had not seen for many years came to my office. He had a large testicular mass, something he ignored until it became painful, not because of youthful imaginations of invulnerability but due to the absence of health insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 6, 2009
    by Austin Frakt | The Incidental Economist Blog
    A recent Business Week article summarized an argument against a public option that is based on the unfounded claims of cost shifting made by insurers and hospitals.

  • Posted on Monday, October 5, 2009
    By Billy Zou | The Dartmouth
    For those who have been living outside the U.S. or in a cave, two health care reform bills have been proposed to universalize the American health care system. One, H.R. 3200, proposes a public health insurance plan or "public option," while the other, H.R. 676, would create a single-payer system that would cover all medically essential care.

  • Posted on Monday, October 5, 2009
    By SinglePayerAction.org
    In the Rose Garden this morning, President Obama met with a group of doctors. From all fifty states. Banned from the meeting were doctors from Physicians for a National Health Program -- representing more than 17,000 docs who support a single payer health care system.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Colin Moynihan | New York Times | City Room Blog
    Right-wing and antigovernment activists -- a few of them wielding not only signs but even loaded firearms -- have organized some of the angry protests surrounding the health care debate. But in Midtown Manhattan on Tuesday morning, a different sort of health care protest took place, led by left-leaning groups who accused insurers of greed and called for nationwide, single-payer health insurance.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    by Private Health Insurance Must Go!
    19 citizens and health care providers arrested, launching national mobilization for health care for all.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Dann Denny | Herald Times (Bloomington, Ind.)
    Dr. Rob Stone, an emergency room physician at Bloomington Hospital and director of Hoosiers for a Commonsense Health Plan, said the U.S. stands alone among industrialized countries in the world. "We are the only country that does not provide health care to all its citizens," he said. "It's a bad situation and it's getting worse."

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Janell Ross | The Tennessean
    Kenneth Hoagland went to jail for what started as a cold. Hoagland had refinanced his Nashville home to pay off the $25,000 tab for his weeklong diabetes-related stay at Southern Hills Medical Center. The new mortgage left Hoagland out of medical debt but afraid to get sick again.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Doug Trapp | AMNews
    The uninsured might be about 40% more likely to die than the privately insured, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Public Health. In contrast, a 1993 Institute of Medicine study concluded that those without health coverage were 25% more likely to die.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Sarah Bloom | Indiana Daily Student
    The Mad as Hell Doctors, based in Oregon, made their case for a single-payer system at the Bloomington Farmer's Market on Sept. 19. The traveling doctors are making their way to Capitol Hill in an attempt to meet with Congress and President Barack Obama.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    by Ashley Smith | Dissident Voice
    The politicians declared one plan for health care reform "off the table" from the beginning: a single-payer system that would cover all Americans and cut out private insurance. But as Dr. Andy Coates explains, it remains the only alternative that can solve the crisis of the health care non-system.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Deb Richter | The Progressive Media Project
    Nearly 45,000 deaths in the United States each year are attributable to the lack of health insurance, according to a Harvard University study released in September. That astonishing figure, which appears in the American Journal of Public Health, is a big uptick from the Institute of Medicine's finding seven years ago that 18,000 people die each year because they lack insurance and thus have less access to care.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
    By Patricia C. McCarter | Huntsville Times
    Everybody in. Nobody out. With these four words, Huntsville pediatrician Pippa Abston described what she believes is the best health care option for America. She also described it as "Medicare for all," a concept that concerns citizens who don't support the federal government getting bigger.

  • Posted on Sunday, October 4, 2009
  • Posted on Wednesday, September 30, 2009
    By Thomas Geoghegan | The Nation
    This past spring, Senator Claire McCaskill wrote to me asking for $50 to help elect more Democrats, so we could have a filibuster-proof Senate. Now that Al Franken has finally been declared the sixtieth Democratic senator, her plea may seem moot. But even with Franken in office, we don't have a filibuster-proof Senate. To get to sixty on the Democratic side, we'll still have to cut deals with Democrats like Max Baucus, Ben Nelson and others who cat around as Blue Dogs from vote to vote. Whether or not Senator Arlen Specter is a Democrat, the real Democrats will still have to cut the same deals to get sixty votes.

  • Posted on Monday, September 28, 2009
    Matthew Hine, M.D., M.P.H. | The Chattanoogan
    I'm an advocate of the best of capitalism and a free market for most commodities. However, health care is not in the same category as a bushel of corn or an automobile. A health care delivery system that is designed to maximize profit will never deliver the ultimate objective: affordable, universal access to quality health care.

  • Posted on Monday, September 28, 2009
    Citizens and health care providers today staged a sit-in at the offices of Aetna, one of the nation’s largest health insurance companies, in New York City (99 Park Ave @40th. The action is part of a national mobilization to end health insurance abuses such as the denial of coverage for lifesaving treatments, and win support for the only real public option -- Medicare for all, a single payer plan. The action was part of a Mobilization for Health Care for All campaign that includes actions in Chicago, Los Angeles, and other cities across the country.

  • Posted on Monday, September 28, 2009
    By Michael Moore | Huffington Post
    Now we know why they've stopped calling this health care reform, and started calling it insurance reform. The current bills advancing in Congress look more like rearranging the deck chairs on the insurance Titanic than actually ending our long health care nightmare.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2009
    By Trudy Lieberman | Columbia Journalism Review
    Is Senator Baucus becoming more charitable? Last week the Montana senator--who has been, by virtue of his chairmanship of the Senate Finance Committee, in the midst of the health care storm for months--finally released the Chairman's Mark of the Senate health care bill. (That's Congress speak for the bill draft that already has the paw prints of the special-interest lobbyists all over it.) Before legislation reaches this stage, the deals have pretty much been cut, though not all of them. Working closely with the myriad lobbying groups that have swarmed all over his Committee, the senator managed to get consensus around some important elements.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2009
    Three articles on the connection between Sen. Max Baucus and Liz Fowler, former executive and current lobbyist for Wellpoint.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2009
    By Arnold S. Relman, M.D. | Tikkun Magazine
    There are two interrelated critical issues in health reform right now: how to extend and improve insurance coverage, and how to control the unsustainable rise in health care expenditures. Virtually all of the current legislative attention is focused on the first issue but, notwithstanding claims to the contrary, none of the proposals now on the table offers any credible solution for the control of rising costs. Without control of health cost inflation, the present system will not be viable much longer.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 24, 2009
    By Holly Sklar | Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune News Service
    More Americans die of lack of health insurance than terrorism, homicide, drunk driving and HIV combined. Grandma could be dead from lack of health insurance before she turns 65 and gets Medicare - 80 percent of first-time grandparents are in their 40s and 50s.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 23, 2009
    By PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS | Counterpunch
    The current health care "debate" shows how far gone representative government is in the United States. Members of Congress represent the powerful interest groups that fill their campaign coffers, not the people who vote for them.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 23, 2009
    Editorial | Louisville Courier-Journal
    Forty-five thousand a year. That's not a salary. That's a statistic. And behind every number in that statistic is the life of a human being that ended because the person was uninsured.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 23, 2009
    By Madison Park | CNNhealth.com
    A freelance cameraman's appendix ruptured and by the time he was admitted to surgery, it was too late. A self-employed mother of two is found dead in bed from undiagnosed heart disease. A 26-year-old aspiring fashion designer collapsed in her bathroom after feeling unusually fatigued for days. Paul Hannum's family members say he probably would've gone to the hospital earlier if he had had health insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009
    Comment by Ray Bellamy, MD | Prescriptions Blog | New York Times
    Congress and America would benefit by a head-to-head comparison by an independent agency such as the CBO or other comparing Single Payer with any other proposal you want to offer. Single Payer would win hands down, as the rest of the developed world has already figured out.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009
    By Sean Rose | Courier Journal
    A group of Oregon doctors stopped by Louisville and Jeffersonville, Ind., on Tuesday to voice their anger over what they see as a broken health care system.

  • Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009
    By T. R. Reid | NEWSWEEK
    "Us Canadians, we're kind of understated by nature," Marcus Davies told me in his soft-spoken way. "We don't go around chanting 'We're No. 1!' But you know, there are two areas where we feel superior to the U.S.: hockey and health care."

  • Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009
    By Russell Mokhiber | SinglePayerAction.org
    Single payer activists have set up a memorial on the National Mall for the more than 44,000 Americans who die every year from lack of health insurance.

  • Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009
    By Faye Flam | Philadelphia Inquirer
    When politicians and pundits speak of "a slippery slope to socialism" and "government takeover of health care," they're using terms straight from the industry PR machine, said Wendell Potter.

  • Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009
    Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting | Action Alert
    The New York Times devoted some rare space on September 20 to discussing single-payer (or Medicare-for-all) health reform. The result? A one-sided account of why such a system couldn't work.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009
    by Elizabeth Crane | The Brandeis Hoot
    In a point that has gone unacknowledged throughout the current debate, Medicare has endured as one of the most effective components of our health care system. Now, instead of decrying the role of government in health care, Americans should embrace it and expand Medicare to all citizens in an inclusive single-payer system.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009
    WKOW
    Hundreds of people gathered on the capitol steps Thursday in support of a single payer health care plan.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009
    Appleton Mason, M.D. | Times Union (Albany, NY) | Letter to the Editor
    We want a system that is more efficient and cost-effective, and continues to value the doctor-patient relationship. I believe we do not need insurance companies and that some type of single-payer system would be much better. Decisions within this system would have to safeguard the freedom to choose care and the assurance that policy would be made by an autonomous organization within government.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009
    Dr. Robert Golden | The Spokesman-Review
    In recent health care debates people proclaim they don't want the government standing between them and their physician. Some have adamantly opposed a "single-payer" health plan while demanding, "Don't touch my Medicare." As a physician practicing in Spokane for the past 26 years, I would like to share my experiences.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009
    By Independent Record | Helena Independent Record
    Last week's Question of the Week, "If there were a national referendum on single-payer health insurance for all, how would you vote? For, or against?" touched a nerve.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009
    By Susan Heavey | Reuters
    Nearly 45,000 people die in the United States each year -- one every 12 minutes -- in large part because they lack health insurance and can not get good care, Harvard Medical School researchers found in an analysis released on Thursday.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009
    By Elizabeth Cooney | Boston Globe
    As medical care has improved for people with health insurance, the consequences of being uninsured have worsened, according to a new study that says the lack of coverage translates into nearly 45,000 deaths each year among working-age Americans.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009
    HealthDay News | Atlanta Journal Constitution
    If you doubt that lack of health insurance can have deadly consequences, consider these new findings: Americans without health insurance are 40 percent more likely to die than those with private insurance.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009
  • Posted on Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    AFL-CIO CONVENTION
    One concrete plan that meets the test of comprehensive, universal health coverage would build on our nation’s successful universal health coverage plan for seniors: Medicare.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    By Michael Hiltzik | LA Times
    Pity the medically uninsured in America. As if they don't already have enough to worry about, now they've become a political football.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    By John Nichols | The Nation
    Canada did not establish its national health care program with a bold, immediate political move by the federal government. The initial progress came at the provincial level, led by the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's Tommy Douglas when he served from 1941 to 1960 premier of Saskatchewan. The universal, publicly-funded "single-payer" health care system that Douglas and his socialist allies developed in Saskatchewan proved to be so successful and so popular that it was eventually adopted by other provinces and, ultimately, by Canada's federal government.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    By Rep. Anthony Weiner | Politico
    It seems that big legislation isn't complete until it develops a collection of catchphrases. ("Shovel ready," everyone? "Cash for clunkers," perhaps?) The effort to tackle the long list of failings of our health care system and the way we pay for it has been no exception. This time, we are arguing over the so-called public option.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    by Sara Marshall | Orcinius.com
    True confessions: I missed the health care speech. While the whole lefty blogosphere was watching and blogging and tweeting, I was sacked out in my attic bedroom high on a mountainside in Vancouver, sleeping off a narcotic haze and the exhausting aftermath of a long night spent in the emergency room at Lions Gate Hospital.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    by National Nurses Movement | DailyKos
    The campaign for the most comprehensive healthcare reform of all, single payer, won a huge boost Tuesday as the AFL-CIO voted unanimously at its national convention in Pittsburgh to endorse the enactment of single-payer, universal healthcare.

  • Posted on Monday, September 14, 2009
    By VICENTE NAVARRO | CounterPunch
    I don't doubt that President Obama, a decent man, wants to provide universal health care to all citizens of this country. But his judgment in developing his strategy to reach that goal is profoundly flawed, and ... it may cost him the presidency -- an outcome that would be extremely negative for the country.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009
    Tikkun Daily
    President Obama knows that a single-payer program -- extending Medicare to everyone -- is far more rational than what he has proposed to Congress, but he also believes that eliminating the insurance companies, hospital chains, and other medical profiteers would require a battle beyond his current capacities.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009
    By George S. McGovern | Washington Post
    For many years, a handful of American political leaders -- including the late senator Ted Kennedy and now President Obama -- have been trying to gain passage of comprehensive health care for all Americans. As far back as President Harry S. Truman, they have urged Congress to act on this national need. In a presentation before a joint session of Congress last week, Obama offered his view of the best way forward.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009
    BY JOHN KAY | News & Observer
    Opponents of health-care reform have tried to twist the idea of a single-payer system into some sort of threat to the American way of medicine. They are wrong. As someone who spent half my working life in Canada and half in the United States, I've been covered by two single-payer health systems, one in Canada and now under Medicare. They both work.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009
    By MIKE DENNISON | The Missoulian
    Retired internist Robert Seward, a self-described "Mad as Hell" doctor who wants a publicly funded health system that covers all Americans, told a Helena crowd Thursday that he had a telling conversation with a Canadian citizen a day earlier.

  • Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009
    By Lara Wright, M.D. | Guest Commentary
    I AM a family physician who has firsthand experience about the need for health insurance reform. In 1999, after completing a residency in family practice, I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Fortunately, I had use COBRA to continue my health benefits for 18 months. When my diagnosis was made, I still had health insurance, as well as supportive family, friends and colleagues who worked in health care.