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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest Archives

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Monday, November 26, 2007
    by Tom Walsh | The Ellsworth American
    Now living near Digby, Paul and Gretchen Volenik are enjoying all that rural Nova Scotia has to offer, including tax-funded medical care.

  • Posted on Monday, November 26, 2007
    Uwe E. Reinhardt | The New York Times | Letter to the Editor
    If Mr. Giuliani despises socialized medicine, as he now contends, perhaps he would abolish the V.A. health system if he were elected president. American veterans should challenge him to come clean on the issue.

  • Posted on Monday, November 26, 2007
    The California Democratic Party | Resolution Number ANA07.15
    BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the CDP strongly supports the drafting and passage of legislation that creates and enacts a single-payer health care program which provides comprehensive, secure, high quality, efficient and sustainable access to health care for all Californians.

  • Posted on Monday, November 26, 2007
    by Andrew D. Coates | Monthly Review
    Thus, this SCHIP expansion, even if enacted, would still fall short of meeting all the unmet needs as private health insurance fails ever more children than before. So one step forward, one step back.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 20, 2007
    By Marshall Helmberger and Tom Klein
    The merits of the Canadian style of health care have been the subject of intense debate in the U.S. for months, sparked in part by Michael Moore’s recent documentary film, “Sicko”, which highlighted Canada’s system among others. Free market advocates have shot back, pointing to studies that show growing dissatisfaction among Canadians over long wait times for some types of medical care.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 15, 2007
    BY ERIC COOK | Kalamazoo Gazette
    Dr. James C. Mitchiner said single-payer health insurance can greatly reduce health care costs by removing the profits and broadening the risk pool. Mitchiner is an emergency-room physician at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor and president-elect of the Washtenaw County Medical Society.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 14, 2007
    Indira Dammu | Indiana Daily Student
    Contrary to Republican claims, however, no Democratic presidential candidate has advocated a "free" universal health care system. Sen. John Edward’s health care plan, the most promising within the field, calls for a small tax increase and repeal of Bush’s tax cuts for the wealthy. Sixty percent of Americans support such a tax increase if it means universal access to health care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 13, 2007
    Harriette Seiler | Modern Healthcare
    Despite having good doctors and good hospitals, U.S. healthcare outcomes do not compare very favorably with those of other industrialized nations.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 13, 2007
    Robyn Blumner | Salt Lake Tribune
    Americans were taken in by health insurance industry foils Harry and Louise the first time Clinton offered this country decent health care reform, but they won't be fooled again. If Giuliani wants to make this election a referendum on America's health care system, he's going to flame out faster than a hospital can dump an uninsured patient.

  • Posted on Monday, November 12, 2007
    Rachel Nardin | The Boston Globe
    The VA is a rare success story in our healthcare system. The system offers more equitable and higher quality care than the average care in the private sector, and has become a medical leader in research, primary care, and computerization. Studies in the Annals of Internal Medicine and elsewhere have shown that compared with patients in HMOs, a higher percentage of patients at VA facilities have adequate control of high blood pressure and diabetes, and receive appropriate medications after a heart attack. So it's not the quality of care that veterans receive that's the problem; rather, it's their restricted access to care.

  • Posted on Monday, November 12, 2007
    By PAUL KRUGMAN | The New York Times | Op-Ed Columnist
    You might think that these facts would make the case for major reform of America's health care system -- reform that would involve, among other things, learning from other countries' experience -- irrefutable. Instead, however, apologists for the status quo offer a barrage of excuses for our system's miserable performance. So I thought it would be useful to offer a catalog of the most commonly heard apologies for American health care, and the reasons they won't wash.

  • Posted on Monday, November 12, 2007
    Jonathan Cohn | The New Republic
    If you've listened to Rudy Giuliani or any of the other Republican presidential candidates lately, then you've probably heard them claim that creating universal health care would necessarily lead to inferior treatments, particularly for deadly diseases like cancer. But that just isn't so. While the United States is a world leader in cancer care, other countries, such as France, Sweden, and Switzerland, boast overall survival rates that are nearly comparable. For some variants--such as cervical cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and two common forms of leukemia--the U.S. survival rate, although good, lags behind at least some other countries.

  • Posted on Monday, November 12, 2007
    By Vicente Navarro | Professor of Health and Public Policy | The Johns Hopkins University
    In his article "The Hillarycare Mythology" (The American Prospect, October 2007, pp. 12-18), Paul Starr, a senior health policy advisor to President Bill Clinton and a leading figure in Hillary Rodham Clinton's White House task force on health care reform, analyzes the origins, development, and final outcome of the Clinton administration's health care reform -- referred to by Republicans as "Hillarycare."

  • Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2007
    Steve Pomerance | The Daily Camera
    The single-payer approach provides savings from eliminating unnecessary costs that will help to cover the increased level of basic care that currently is simply not provided, so the final societal bill may not increase dramatically, and may even be reduced.

  • Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2007
    Jay Bhatt | Letters to the Editor | The Baltimore Sun
    As a medical student, I see the impact our broken health care system has on individuals and communities every day. Figures from the Institute of Medicine show that the lack of health insurance causes about 18,000 unnecessary deaths every year in this country.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2007
    James Clancy addresses Physicians for a National Health Program in Washington
    Speaking to an American group called Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), Clancy said only a small minority of people in Canada favour private health care solutions such as private insurance, user fees, medical savings accounts and parallel for-profit care. "The vast majority of Canadians have repeatedly said No to these proposals, because the principles on which these proposals rest cannot be reconciled with the values at the heart of our medicare," Clancy said.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2007
    Registered Nurse Response Network | Press Release
    Michael Moore's healthcare "horror" film SiCKO will continue its unique impact on American society and politics with its Nov. 6 DVD release, which will be commemorated with more than 125 nurse-led house parties around the nation, the Registered Nurse Response Network (RNRN) reports today.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2007
    Bob Herbert | New York Times
    It would be great if there were something unusual about this story: A person without health insurance gets sick. The person holds off on going to the doctor because there's no way to pay the bill. The person is denied the full range of treatment because of the absence of insurance. The person dies.

  • Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2007
    Miles Mogulescu | The Huffington Post
    In Part 1 of this multi-part Huffpost series on the health care debate, I criticized the leading Democratic candidates -- Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and John Edwards -- for surrendering, without firing a shot, to the insurance and drug companies by opposing universal single payer health care. In this second installment, I elaborate on the difference between universal single payer health care and the Clinton/Obama/Edwards universal insurance mandate plans and argue that universal mandates are bad social policy.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    By JULIE BOSMAN | The New York Times
    But the Commonwealth Fund said yesterday that Dr. Gratzer had misused its research by calculating a five-year survival rate based on data on prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in the United States and Britain. "Five-year survival rates cannot be calculated from incidence and mortality rates, as any good epidemiologist knows," the group said in a statement.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    By Vicente Navarro | Professor of Health and Public Policy | The Johns Hopkins University
    Whereas Jackson had called for a single-payer program similar to that in Canada, Clinton chose the opposite pole of the political spectrum: managed care competition. Managed care competition basically meant the insurance companies exercised full control over health care providers, with doctors working in group practices called Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs).

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    Greg Silver, M.D. | Letters to the Editor | St. Petersburg Times
    If "market-based" health care is so wonderful, how did it lead us to the miserable state of health care in this country today? Our leaders seem to have forgotten the fundamental truth of market systems: There are always "winners" at the expense of "losers." Will we, as a nation, continue to accept our fellow citizens as health care losers in order for health insurance companies to be the big winners?

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    DR. H. DAVID PRENSKY | Letter to the Editor | Palm Beach Daily News
    As it is now, costs are rising so outrageously that the 47 million without insurance have nightmares, worried over being hit with a serious medical condition. Too many of them find reality nightmarish when they actually are hit. In the words of Dr. Marcia Angell, for years editor in chief of the New England Journal and now a Harvard Medical School professor, "We can no longer afford not to have single-payer universal health care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    By TIM JOSEPH | Times Union
    As an elected county leader, I find that a tremendous amount of my time, and my county's budget, is devoted to one or another aspect of health care for some segment of our citizens. Nearly all of that time is devoted not to delivering health care, but to sorting out who will pay for it. A big advantage of a single-payer system, compared with our current patchwork, is that it resolves this issue once and for all, and thus offers substantial savings in administrative costs.

  • Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2007
    by Paul Clay Sorum, MD; Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Albany Medical College | The Journal of County Administration
    Private insurers add enormous costs to our already skyrocketing medical expenditures. These include both insurers’ administrative costs--the salaries of their highly-paid executives and armies of employees, their marketing expenses, and (in the case of for-profit insurers) their profits--and the billing related costs imposed on providers. In California, billing and insurance-related functions for insurers and providers represent 20-22 percent of privately insured spending in California acute care settings.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007
    Susanne L. King, M.D. | Berkshire Eagle
    Physicians in Massachusetts are not alone in their dissatisfaction with the current health care system. More and more doctors across the country are joining Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which advocates for single-payer health care, funded and administered by the government. PNHP membership has increased to more than 14,000 members, and is growing rapidly. Single-payer health care is not socialized medicine; physician practices and hospitals would still be private, and patients would have their choice of providers. Single-payer health care is about the administration of our health care funds, not the delivery of health care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007
    Janet K. Seeley, M.D., Ph.D | The Coloradoan
    The single-payer proposal for Colorado health care reform solves the problem of multiple risk pools and reduces administrative costs by setting up a publicly financed trust fund. Yes, public financing means state health care taxes, but they are more than offset by the savings in current state and federal taxes for public programs, insurance premiums, high copays, deductibles and many out-of-pocket health expenses. For most of us, that would be less expensive than what we spend today.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007
    By Steven Reinberg | Health Day
    Almost 2 million veterans are without health insurance, along with 3.8 million members of their households, a new study finds. Among the 1.8 million uninsured veterans, 12.7 percent are under 65. In addition, the number of uninsured veterans has increased by 290,000 between 2000 and 2004, according to the report in the Oct. 30 online edition of the American Journal of Public Health.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007
    By Avram Goldstein | Bloomberg News
    Justin Lake, an analyst at UBS Securities in New York, downgraded Humana to "sell'' from "neutral,'' saying the company's 2008 enrollment forecast of at least 200,000 added Medicare customers is optimistic, and that the profitable government payments can't last. Members of the U.S. Congress and consumer groups said the amount of profit was excessive. "We continue to see this operating environment as temporary, and now that strong earnings/guidance are behind us, investor focus is likely to shift to potentially unsettling items,'' including efforts by presidential candidates and members of Congress to trim Medicare payments, Lake said in a note to clients today.

  • Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007
    By JIM McDERMOTT | The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    If anyone tells you that you can't trust government, ask them who they trust to protect America from terrorist threats, protect consumers from unsafe products in the marketplace, protect airline travelers by ensuring we have safe skies.

  • Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007
    By Michael Hochman and David Himmelstein | Baltimore Sun
    Michael Moore's film Sicko gave a big boost to the movement for single-payer national health insurance this year. But even those turned off by Mr. Moore's less-than-subtle style will find many reasons to support a single-payer system. As the number of uninsured and underinsured Americans continues to rise and medical costs spiral out of control, these reasons are increasingly compelling.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 25, 2007
    By Malinda Markowitz | San Jose Mercury News
    Sadly, the main beneficiaries of a rushed "compromise" will be the same insurance companies that created the present crisis. They would harvest millions of new customers, with the government using its power and the public purse to further an insurance industry that will continue to be able to profiteer and deny care.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2007
    Press Associates, Inc. (PAI)
    A big New York state union, the 58,000-member Public Employees Federation, has joined the growing group that backs government-run single-payer health care. And former Vice President Al Gore does, too.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2007
    By BOB HERBERT | Op-Ed Columnist | The New York Times
    Mrs. Brodrick learned last May that she had cancer of the duodenum, and it had already spread to her liver and pancreas. Not only is the prognosis grim, but the medical expenses will soon leave the couple destitute. Mrs. Brodrick has no health insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2007
    by Mikael Rudolph | http://www.opednews.com
    Single Payer Health Care works. Italy got it in place virtually seamlessly about 45 years after their dance with the fascism that Mussolini himself defined as "Corporatism".

  • Posted on Monday, October 22, 2007
    By Peter Phillips and Bridget Thornton | MinutemanMedia.org
    If industrialized countries around the world offer health care as a basic right, why is it not happening in the US? Private insurance companies are motivated to make as much money as possible and do so by systematically delaying, diminishing, and denying payment for promised services, and blaming individuals for their own misfortune.

  • Posted on Monday, October 22, 2007
    The California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee thanks Al Gore for his forceful new words in support of the kind of universal, non-profit, single-payer healthcare that this country desperately needs--and that is succeeding in nearly every other industrialized democracy.

  • Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007
    Senior fellows at the Rockridge Institute, including cognitive linguistGeorge Lakoff, author of the best-selling "Don't Think of an Elephant," have joined together to examine the hidden truths in our raging national debate over health care. And to bring their new report, "The Logic of the Health Care Debate" to life, the Rockridge Institute has produced a video spot that dramatizes the way in which our current health care system is based on excluding nearly half of the American family -- concluding with the provocative question: "Which one of your children would you leave unprotected?"

  • Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007
    by DrSteveB | DailyKos
    In this case, the cohort is the House of Representatives. The Relative Risk (RR) is the risk of an event (developing a disease; voting against SCHIP) relative to exposure (being a Repuglican). Relative risk is a ratio of the probability of the event occurring in the exposed group versus the control (non-exposed) group, or in this case the probability of the voting against SCHIP for Repuglicans compared to Democrats.

  • Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007
    By Bryce Benson | Chico News Review
    "We can no longer afford the waste and inefficiency, the high overhead and outrageous executive salaries of the private insurance industry," McCanne said. "Only reforms that end our reliance on defective private coverage and assure guaranteed coverage for all will work."

  • Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007
    Universal Health Care Foundation Newsletter
    "Un seguro médico, para todos, de por vida. One health insurance, for all, for life. That is our goal." So declared Jaime Torres, a podiatrist and hospital administrator in New York City. "Latinos in the U.S. are three times as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to lack health insurance," explained Dr. Torres. "We must close the gap so that affordable and accessible health care is available to all living in the U.S."

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2007
    By Joseph White | Case Western Reserve University | The Milbank Quarterly
    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate “market-oriented” measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States’ labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2007
    Walter Tsou, MD, MPH | October 2007 | Clinical Advisor | Commentary
    John was 50 years old. He had hypertension, diabetes, and a third and equally insidious condition--no health insurance. Although John had found sporadic medical care in emergency departments and "sliding-scale" clinics over the years, decades of spotty management had irreversibly damaged his kidneys and placed him on the list for hemodialysis. The good news is that dialysis--the only procedure categorically paid for by Medicare--allowed him, finally, to qualify for health insurance.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2007
    The summaries were created by Foundation staff and consultants, and do not include critical information about whether the plans would actually achieve the stated goals, such as expanding access or controlling costs. For critical commentary on the candidates' health plans, see Dr. Don McCanne's Health Policy Quote of the Day.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2007
    Los Angeles Times Editorial
    If you happen to have been a reader of The Times in 1918, you'd probably be terrified to see the German-pedigreed Arnold Schwarzenegger linked to anything having to do with healthcare reform. Of course, times change, and so has the paper's editorial stance on healthcare reform. In 1918 -- the earliest year in which The Times addressed healthcare reform -- any semblance of government insurance on the state or national level prompted warnings of creeping toward that hideous German autocracy our boys were fighting in Europe during World War I.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2007
    by Ellen R. Shaffer and Joe Brenner | Common Dreams
    The corporate winners who now drive the global economy have unmoored themselves from the social contract, no longer relying on secure employment and rising standards of living to bolster consumer spending. The safety net to tide us over in troubled times has been abandoned. Weakened public institutions have also damaged health and the availability of health care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2007
    Diane Francis | Financial Post
    American health care is an oxymoron and the system represents our major trading partner's biggest competitive disadvantage going forward. And yet it is the 800-pound gorilla in the room that's ignored during these presidential-election primaries and runoffs. Nobody touches the fact that this is a huge business and economic issue, besides a socio-political one.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2007
    By Dr. Robert McMurtry
    The fake letter is so patently ridiculous and written from an right wing American view that it should be exposed. My response in brief is that single payer works.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2007
    Bob Jewett | Letter to the Editor | Des Moines Register
    In May of this year, the AMA reported that a survey of its members found that half the patients with Medicare Advantage HMOs and PPOs were denied services typically covered by traditional Medicare. The same survey also reported that 51 percent of its doctors received lower payments from Medicare Advantage plans than from traditional Medicare.

  • Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007
    Editorial | The Berkshire Eagle
    President Bush's veto of legislation providing an overdue expansion of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP) is the latest of many examples of the foolishness that can result when ideology is allowed to trump all else, including logic and fairness. Mr. Bush, who worries about creeping socialism as if was still 1957, is beyond hope, but if enough congressional Republicans can set aside the ideology that helped put them in the minority and do what is right, his veto could still be overridden later this month.

  • Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007
    By Larry Mitchell | The Enterprise Record
    Trying to fix the present system the way the leading Democratic presidential candidates and Gov. Schwarzenegger propose doing, makes no sense, said McCanne, a senior health policy fellow for Physicians for a National Health Program, an organization advocating the single-payer system.

  • Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007
    BY KEVIN DUGGAN | The Coloradoan
    "Private, for-profit health insurance served its purpose in the early part of the 20th century, but it is obsolete for the 21st century," said Dr. Kathy Waller, of Fort Collins.

  • Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007
    Roger Bybee | Letter to the Editor | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    The Journal Sentinel editorial contended that a single-payer system -- like those in Canada, Taiwan and France -- is not "politically doable." Yet BusinessWeek’s May 17, 2005, poll showed "67% of all Americans think it’s a good idea to guarantee health care for all U.S. citizens, as Canada and Britain do, with just 27% dissenting."

  • Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007
    by David Himmelstein, MD | Posted by CommonHealth | WBUR 90.9
    The Connector merely serves as a glorified insurance broker, signing people up for coverage with plans like Blue Cross and Harvard Pilgrim. So on top of the 4% to 5% cut of every premium dollar that the Connector takes, Blue Cross and Harvard Pilgrim take their 15%. (I can't tell you what Tufts' share is -- their annual report for 2006 left out the figures -- though it does let slip that its net worth rose by $96 million even as enrollment fell).

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007
    By PHYLLIS BROWN | Napa Valley Register
    Single-payer healthcare, as would be established by HR 676 in Congress and SB 840 in California, is the only effective, genuine cure for our current healthcare nightmare. It is the only health reform that is universal, that assures uniform, comprehensive benefits for all, that guarantees patients' choice of doctor or medical facility, and that ends the routine, callous denial of care by insurance companies. It's also the only reform that restores health security for American families by bringing an end to ever-rising insurance premiums, deductibles, co-pays and rising drug and hospital charges.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 9, 2007
    By David Lazarus | Los Angeles Times
    I write a lot about healthcare reform. Now it's personal. I was diagnosed this past week with diabetes. As of Friday, I was injecting myself with insulin, something I'll be doing four or five times a day, every day, for the rest of my life. Without the injections, I'll likely die.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 9, 2007
    Saul Friedman | Gray Matters | Newsday
    There is something in the air besides autumn. I've been waiting for readers to take me to task for the Gray Matters of Aug. 4, in which I suggested that all of us - young and old - needed a single-payer universal health plan, Medicare for All, even if it meant raising some taxes.

  • Posted on Tuesday, October 9, 2007
    By ROBERT PEAR | The New York Times
    Tens of thousands of Medicare recipients have been victims of deceptive sales tactics and had claims improperly denied by private insurers that run the system's huge new drug benefit program and offer other private insurance options encouraged by the Bush administration, a review of scores of federal audits has found.

  • Posted on Friday, October 5, 2007
    By David Montero | Rocky Mountain News
    There may be five proposals being considered to reform health care in Colorado, but only one seemed to satisfy most of the 150 gathered at the Millennium Hotel on Thursday night. That proposal was the so- called single-payer system.

  • Posted on Thursday, October 4, 2007
    Allyson Pollock | The Guardian
    The film is very much made for a US audience. Moore does not go into the huge changes that are taking place in European healthcare - and the new, privatising project going on here. It might surprise many British people who see the film to know that, for example, the British government has for years been in contact with Kaiser Permanente, one of the big US healthcare corporations, and is actively trying to remodel the NHS along American lines. All the reforms carried out by the government over the past few years have been aimed at that.

  • Posted on Wednesday, October 3, 2007
    Leonard Rodberg | Newsday | Letters to the Editor
    These plans offer consumers only a "choice" of health plan, something that few if any consumers care about. What they don't offer is the choice consumers want: the ability to choose their doctors and their hospitals. Instead, the private insurers on whom these plans depend increasingly limit just such choices.

  • Posted on Monday, October 1, 2007
    By Marianne Mattera | Managing Editor | MedPage Today
    Presidential candidates might consider proposing a health care reform package that relies on a single-payer system, if results of a MedPage Today poll reflect the country's mood.

  • Posted on Monday, October 1, 2007
    By Kathy Waller | The Coloradoan
    Let's repeat that for emphasis. The single-payer plan will provide coverage for everyone and save more than a billion dollars for Colorado taxpayers. The other plans cost millions of dollars and still leave hundreds of thousands of people uninsured.

  • Posted on Monday, October 1, 2007
    Submitted by Dan Wilson | Best Syndication
    Michael Moore visited Oprah Winfrey on Thursday to talk about the health insurance industry. His movie Sicko has stirred a debate, and even Oprah admitted that it opened her eyes to the issue. The movie is a warning to the vast majority of Americans who believe they are protected because they have health insurance. The movie does not concern the 50 million without coverage.

  • Posted on Friday, September 28, 2007
    By PHILIP M. BOFFEY | The New York Times
    Rudy Giuliani has used the "s-word" to denounce legislation that would enlarge a children's health insurance program and to besmirch Hillary Clinton's health plan. Mitt Romney has added a xenophobic twist, calling the Clinton plan "European-style socialized medicine," while ignoring its similarities to a much-touted health care reform he championed as governor of Massachusetts. Other conservative critics have wielded the "s-word" to deplore efforts to expand government health care programs or regulation over the private health care markets.

  • Posted on Friday, September 28, 2007
    The Kansas City Star ran a series of articles, editorials, and op-eds on single payer and other health care reform proposals this summer -- here are two pro-single payer letters from their readership.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2007
    By Jamie Court | The Los Angeles Times
    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Assembly Speaker Fabian Nuñez claim they are close to a deal on healthcare reform that will require every Californian to prove they have a private health insurance policy -- but does not cap how much insurers can charge for it. Hillary Clinton's health plan, released last week, would require all Americans to have health insurance, also with no cap on premiums.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2007
    by Michele Swenson | Colorado Springs Independent
    The Colorado Health Services single-payer proposal is the only one of four recently evaluated by the Lewin Group (asked by the state to develop and analyze health-care expansion proposals) projected to save substantial money and insure everyone. Single-payer saves money by eliminating wasteful administrative costs of multiple insurers, and permitting negotiation of bulk rates for pharmaceutical and durable medical goods. Estimated overall net savings is $1.4 billion.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2007
    The doctor and nurse groups aired TV commercials yesterday challenging the health plans of the Democratic frontrunners, Senator Hillary Clinton of New York, former Senator John Edwards of North Carolina and Senator Barack Obama of Illinois. The ads ran only in New England and the Washington area during MSNBC's broadcast of a Democratic candidates' debate at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 26, 2007
    Quentin D. Young, MD and Don McCanne, MD | Chicago Tribune | Letter to the Editor
    Presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton presents us with yet another health-reform proposal based on the fatal strategy of keeping private insurance companies in the driver’s seat. Her proposal won’t cover the 47 million uninsured, or even guarantee that people who have coverage today will have it when they fall ill and are unable to work.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 25, 2007
    Don McCanne, M.D. | The New York Times | Letters to the Editor
    As long as we continue to build on our current fragmented system of financing health care through a multitude of private plans and public programs, we will never get a handle on rising health care costs. The administrative efficiencies of a single national health insurance program would free up enough funds to pay for care for the uninsured and under-insured. But reducing administrative waste alone is not enough.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 25, 2007
    H. DAVID PRENSKY | The Palm Beach Post | Letter to the Editor
    Eliminating more than 1,000 insurance companies with their staffs of clerical workers, advertising and lobbying expenses, dividends to shareholders and large CEO compensation would save the system $400 billion. That is enough to cover every person in the United States. It doesn't call for adopting a system based on Sweden's but on simply expanding our own functioning Medicare. That system, initiated for those 65 and older 42 years ago, would now cover all.

  • Posted on Monday, September 24, 2007
    New York Times | Editorial
    One of the enduring frustrations of presidential elections is that candidates and their parties sound like Tweedledum and Tweedledee on many issues. In 2008, when it comes to health care, which is emerging as a defining domestic issue, voters will find stark differences in philosophy and commitment between Democrats and Republicans.

  • Posted on Monday, September 24, 2007
    by Alison Landes | Palm Beach Post
    Under HR 676, all medically necessary services are covered - primary care, inpatient care, outpatient care, emergency care, prescription drugs, durable medical equipment, long-term care, mental-health services, dentistry, eye care, chiropractic and substance-abuse treatment. Patients get to choose their physicians, providers, hospitals, clinics and practices with no co-pays or deductibles, and private health insurers are prohibited from selling coverage duplicating these benefits.

  • Posted on Monday, September 24, 2007
    By Morton Mintz | Nieman Watchdog | COMMENTARY
    Substantial mainstream reporting on single-payer health insurance should have been triggered--or so one might think--by a succession of studies over the years that establish that Canada's health-care system saves or improves large numbers of lives while not wasting money on administrative expenses and fat executive-pay packages. Almost without fail, Canada gets higher ratings than the U.S.

  • Posted on Monday, September 24, 2007
    BY ROSE ANN DEMORO | LA Daily News
    Under the whip of California Assembly Speaker Fabian Nuñez and Senate President Don Perata, with the active prodding of some labor and interest groups desperate to settle for any health care legislation no matter how bad it is, the California Legislature last week passed a fundamentally flawed bill that just might set back real reform for years.

  • Posted on Friday, September 21, 2007
    By Barbara Ehrenreich | The Huffington Post
    Bow your heads and raise the white flags. After facing down the Third Reich, the Japanese Empire, the U.S.S.R., Manuel Noriega and Saddam Hussein, the United States has met an enemy it dares not confront -- the American private health insurance industry.

  • Posted on Friday, September 21, 2007
  • Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2007
    J. David Gaines, M.D., FACP | Wall Street Journal | Letter to the Editor
    The only solution is to eliminate the HMOs and go to a single-payer system that does not have to be administered by the government. The savings would increase reimbursements to health-care providers (and, it is hoped, stem the annual loss of primary care physicians) so that there would be greater access to care for more patients with fewer hassles.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 19, 2007
    By Annette Fuentes | USA Today
    The face-off between the president and Congress over whether to expand coverage for children highlights a larger issue: It’s about time that the nation has an honest discussion about health care reform.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 19, 2007
    I just read your Wall Street Journal article written on Sept. 13, 2007, titled "Sick Sob Stories." You begin by talking about Tracy's role in 'SiCKO,' and claim the bone marrow transplant denied by our insurer would not have saved him. You also accuse me of "sneering" over our situation.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 19, 2007
    By Rose Ann DeMoro | The Huffington Post
    The pundits might have it right on this one. Hillary Clinton did learn a lesson from her 1994 fiasco on healthcare reform. Unfortunately for most of us who don't have an Inc. after our name or a private jet to cart us around, it was the wrong lesson.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 19, 2007
    Merton C. Bernstein | New York Times | Letters to the Editor
    Our sole hope for funding is to make better use of over $2 trillion already being spent by business and governments. Medicare-for-all would save literally hundreds of billions of dollars on nonbenefit charges by simplifying the processing of billions of billings for insurers and health care providers.

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 18, 2007
    by John Nichols | The Nation
    The former first lady, who snatched defeat from the jaws of victory in the 1990s by responding to the demand for a sane and humane system to deliver affordable medical care to all Americans with a plan to drown the ailing in a bureaucracy designed to augment the profits of the nation's largest insurance companies, is back with an equally heavy-handed and unappealing "reform" proposal.

  • Posted on Monday, September 17, 2007
    By Steffie Woolhandler and David U. Himmelstein | The Boston Globe
    IN 1966 - just before Medicare and Medicaid were launched - 47 million Americans were uninsured. By 1975, the United States had reached an all time low of 21 million without coverage. Now, according to the Census Bureau's latest figures, we're back where we started, with 47 million uninsured in 2006 - up 2.2 million since 2005. But this time, most of the uninsured are neither poor nor elderly.

  • Posted on Monday, September 17, 2007
    Don McCanne, M.D. | California Progress Report
    In a classic example of political irony, Democrats are abandoning their preferred option, single payer reform, in order to reach a compromise with the Republicans and the private insurance industry. They have crafted a model that they believe does not repeat the mistake of the Massachusetts reform program. California Democrats proudly proclaim that they will not require individuals who cannot afford private insurance to be covered by a program that is being inappropriately characterized as universal.

  • Posted on Friday, September 14, 2007
    By Louis Porter | Rutland Herald
    U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., has introduced a bill that would give five states money to try out programs providing for universal health care coverage -- an experiment he hopes will show that so-called single-payer government insurance is "the cost-effective and moral thing to do."

  • Posted on Friday, September 14, 2007
    By Irfan Dhalla, MD | CMAJ | July 3, 2007; 177 (1). doi:10.1503/cmaj.061064. In this article, I will argue that Canada faces a sustainability paradox: despite ever-increasing expenditures, both in absolute dollars and as a percentage of the national income, increases in overall spending on health care in Canada are sustainable for the foreseeable future.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    By Susan Okie, M.D. | New England Journal of Medicine | Perspective | Volume 357:525-529
    For recent immigrants -- especially the estimated 12 million who are here illegally -- seeking health care often involves daunting encounters with a fragmented, bewildering, and hostile system. The reason most immigrants come here is to work and earn money; on average, they are younger and healthier than native-born Americans, and they tend to avoid going to the doctor. Many work for employers who don't offer health insurance, and they can't afford insurance premiums or medical care. They face language and cultural barriers, and many illegal immigrants fear that visiting a hospital or clinic may draw the attention of immigration officials.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    By Timm Herdt | Ventura County Star
    The California Nurses Association opposes any healthcare reform that falls short of blowing up the private insurance-based system and replacing it with a Medicare-style system in which everyone would be insured by the government. It's not this union's style to play nice or to compromise. Whether it's organizing, negotiating, advocating for patients' rights or fighting for political change, the CNA engages in what it calls "intelligent, focused, strategic militancy."

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    Mike Carroll | Mansfield News Journal
    After a wonderful Labor Day weekend I got to wondering what would happen if all workers would demand something be done about the health care crisis we face in this country. How long would it take for our elected leaders to fix this problem if faced with the possibility of losing their positions?

  • Posted on Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    By ROBERT PEAR | New York Times
    Private insurance companies participating in Medicare have been allowed to keep tens of millions of dollars that should have gone to consumers, and the Bush administration did not properly audit the companies or try to recover money paid in error, Congressional investigators say in a new report.

  • Posted on Monday, September 10, 2007
    Aaron E. Carroll, M.D. | The Indianapolis Star
    One year ago, when the U.S. Census Bureau released its figures on Americans lacking health insurance in 2005, I wrote a piece here describing the sad state of the health care system in America. Recently, the 2006 numbers were released, and things have only gotten worse.

  • Posted on Monday, September 10, 2007
    New York Times | Six Letters to the editor
    David Brooks (“The New Social Contract,” column, Sept. 7) dismisses a single-payer health insurance system on the grounds that Americans “will not likely embrace a system that forces them to defer to the central government when it comes to making fundamental health care choices.” Yet the federal government’s Medicare program has strong political support.

  • Posted on Friday, September 7, 2007
    By Rep. Dennis Kucinich | Modern Healthcare
    The real problem, I submit, is that healthcare in the U.S. is delivered by a system that is controlled and directed by for-profit insurance and pharmaceutical companies whose financial prosperity depends on providing as little healthcare as possible. We can no longer treat healthcare as a marketplace commodity for sale to those who can afford it. We must recognize that the U.S. stands alone among major industrialized nations in its failure to ensure adequate healthcare for its citizens is the problem.

  • Posted on Friday, September 7, 2007
    By Pius Kamau | The Denver Post
    We watched the running of the bulls in Pamplona from the safety of a balcony off a physician's office. A crashing crowd of thousands and half a dozen bulls ran down the narrow street below us. Then we saw a bull make an about-turn and attack several people, among them Lawrence and Michael Lenahan, brothers from Philadelphia. One suffered a deep wound to his buttocks; the other a less serious leg wound. Both required hospitalization. I visited the ultra-modern University Hospital where the Lenahans were taken, a facility where heart and kidney transplants are routinely performed. I believe their care was as good as that offered in many American trauma centers.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 6, 2007
    Lt. Gov. John Garamendi (D) is touring California to gather support for a state-run, single-payer health care system, the Fresno Bee reports.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 6, 2007
    By Deborah Burger | Los Angeles Times
    In alliance with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Democratic leaders of the state Legislature, led by Assembly Speaker Fabian Nuñez are rushing to enact a substandard health reform plan that will not reduce the health insecurity of California families.

  • Posted on Thursday, September 6, 2007
    The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) is the ninth international union to endorse HR 676, single payer healthcare legislation introduced by Congressman John Conyers (D-MI). The union represents 720,000 active and retired members.

  • Posted on Wednesday, September 5, 2007
    By Mark Gruenberg | Workday Minnesota
    Labor unions will make achievement of affordable, universal health care the centerpiece of the 2008 election drive, elevating the issue to the top of the national domestic agenda, AFL-CIO President John Sweeney announced.