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PNHP RESOURCES

Articles of Interest Archives

These articles highlight many of the health care related stories in the news–ranging from single-payer op-eds by PNHP members to reports by newspapers on corporate health care.

  • Posted on Thursday, May 5, 2011
    By Johnathon S. Ross, M.D., M.P.H. | Communique: Academy of Medicine of Toledo and Lucas County
    Many physicians care about the injustice of a health care system that leaves 50 million of our patients, friends and family uninsured, but it is health care spending that threatens to destabilize the entire U.S. economy. We need to cover the uninsured and control costs. There are 50 million uninsured Americans despite spending $2.6 trillion annually. This is about one-sixth of the entire country uninsured and spending is at 17 percent of our GDP.

  • Posted on Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    By Uwe E. Reinhardt | The Milken Institute Review, 2007
    Many complain that a single payer system will inevitably lead to rationing. Reinhardt explains how health care is rationed in the U.S today and why rationing by ability to pay is the most intolerable form of rationing. "There is solid research showing the price system rations uninsured Americans out of the timely, early-stage primary and secondary care that might have avoided their serious or fatal illnesses."

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    By Dave Gram | Forbes
    Vermont Senate negotiators dropped an amendment to bar illegal immigrants from coverage under a new state health care program, delivering a victory Monday evening to human rights activists who had rallied repeatedly at the Statehouse to demand the change.

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    By Dave Gram | Greenfield (Ind.) Reporter
    Even now, Dr. Deb Richter is haunted by images of some of the patients she saw at inner-city clinics where she worked in Buffalo, N.Y., during the 1980s.

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    Dr. Francis Pasley | Letters | Burlington Free Press
    I am a medical doctor, semi-retired living in Vermont and having a limited practice. Prior to moving to Vermont two and a half years ago I practiced full time, dividing my practice between the Detroit area in Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, an hour drive from Detroit. Thus I have a substantial personal knowledge of medical practice in the USA and Canada.

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    ROSE ANN DeMORO | Letters | The New York Times
    The “real choice” would be securing the future of Medicare once and for all by extending it to cover everyone. Through its proven formula of global budgeting and federal bulk-purchasing power, it is the best way to effectively control costs while ensuring that we change our broken health care system from one based on ability to pay to one based on patient need.

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    McClatchy-Tribune Information Services
    Congress caved into corporate interests last year to enact a health care policy that will leave millions of Americans without insurance, do nothing to rein in rising costs and put everyone at the mercy of an unfair, for-profit system, a national advocate for a single-payer health system said in Albuquerque.

  • Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | PR Watch
    If I had stayed in the insurance industry, my net worth would have spiked between 4 p.m. Wednesday and 4 p.m. Thursday last week -- and I wouldn't even have had to show up for work. I'm betting that just about every executive of a for-profit health insurance company, whose total compensation ultimately depends on the value of their stock options, woke up on Good Friday considerably wealthier than they were 24 hours earlier. Why? Because of the spectacular profits that one of those companies reported Thursday morning.

  • Posted on Friday, April 29, 2011
    The Diane Rehm Show | NPR
    On April 27, Dr. Robert Zarr, national board member and co-chair of the D.C. chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program, appeared on NPR's "The Diane Rehm Show" with Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, NPR's Julie Rovner, and the Cato Institute's Michael Cannon

  • Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011
    By Sherif Emil, M.D. | Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons
    Health care should not be a liberal or conservative issue, for disease, disability, and death do not recognize political affiliations. As a socially conservative Christian, my personal belief that health care is a fundamental human right, best guaranteed through single-payer universal health coverage, stems from my faith, and not despite it. My faith calls for personal morality, but also for societal morality -- how do we treat the sick among us, the weak among us, the least among us?

  • Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011
    Yes! Magazine
    A question and answer session with Dr. Ida Hellander helps demystify Vermont's new health care bill.

  • Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011
    Dr. Timothy Shaw | Letters | Capital Times (Madison, Wis.)
    The only correct statement in Gov. Scott Walker’s op-ed column in The New York Times is that Medicaid is obsolete — but not for the reasons he states.

  • Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2011
    By Robert Lowes | Medscape
    Vermont is closer to becoming the first state in the country with something akin to a single-payer healthcare system after today's 21 to 9 vote by the state Senate to approve the plan.

  • Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2011
    By Margaret Flowers, M.D. | FireDogLake
    Leadership in Washington recognizes the damage our soaring health care spending is doing to our entire economy. Although their rhetoric differs, recent budget proposals from both Republicans and Democrats mistakenly place the blame on Medicare and Medicaid. Cuts to and privatization of these important public insurances will place us on a dangerous path that will leave health care costs soaring and more patients unable to afford necessary care.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2011
    ELIZABETH R. ROSENTHAL | Letters | The New York Times
    Re “Patients Are Not Consumers” (column, April 22): Bravo to Paul Krugman. As a physician for 44 years, I have seen the sick person seeking medical care transformed from a patient to a consumer and, like Mr. Krugman, I have been sickened by this.

  • Posted on Monday, April 25, 2011
    By Kay Tillow | Other Words
    More than a year after President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law, our nation's health care delivery and coverage remain the disgrace of the industrialized world. There are more than 50 million uninsured Americans. Even if the health care overhaul works as planned, 23 million Americans will still lack health insurance in 2019.

  • Posted on Monday, April 25, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | PR Watch
    Rep. Paul Ryan's plan to privatize Medicare would accelerate a trend started several years ago by corporate CEOs and their political allies to shift ever-increasing amounts of risk from Big Business and the government to workers and retirees.

  • Posted on Friday, April 22, 2011
    By Glen Ford | Black Agenda Radio
    A new study shows that people in Massachusetts are still going bankrupt in huge numbers because of medical expenses, five years after implementation of a health care plan that is remarkably similar to President Obama’s health package. Like Obama’s bill, the Massachusetts plan compels residents to buy private health insurance. Dr. David Himmelstein is one of the authors of this study.

  • Posted on Friday, April 22, 2011
    By Joe Kimball | MinnPost.com
    The St. Paul City Council passed a resolution Wednesday supporting the Minnesota Health Plan, a proposal that's floating around the Legislature (but not yet close to passing) for single-payer, universal health care in the state.

  • Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2011
    By Jeffrey B. Ritterman, M.D. | Editorial | American Journal of Medicine
    The United States is now the most unequal of the rich developed countries in terms of income and wealth. There are now hundreds of papers and an excellent book, “The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger,” by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (1), which document the health and social costs of rising income inequality. Yet mainstream medicine seems to have hardly taken notice.

  • Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2011
    By Elizabeth Rosenthal | CommonDreams.org
    I recently returned from a visit of several days to an alternate universe: Canadian health care. As a physician who has practiced in the United States for 44 years, I have experienced many aspects of our health care system, including its terrible inequities.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2011
    By Kathryn Corazzelli | Summit (Colo.) Daily News
    The reason Dr. Margaret Flowers works full-time to advocate a universal, single-payer health care model, she told a packed room Thursday, is because she wasn't able to provide the quality of care she wanted to as a pediatrician. Flowers said she was pressured to see more patients in less time, and had to compromise her integrity by not being fully honest to insurance companies about patient problems.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2011
    By Joseph Sparks | Columbia Missourian
    What has been lost in the debate over health care reform is that it would be possible to implement a single-payer system that would cover everybody, prevent those 23,000 unnecessary deaths and reduce health care costs by 40 percent. In 2008, France, which has a single-payer system, spent just over 11 percent of its GDP on health care. In the same year, the U.S. spent 16 percent of its GDP on health care. France is ranked first in health care, while the U.S. is ranked at 37.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2011
    By Arthur Sutherland | Tikkun magazine
    In the wake of Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan’s proposals last week to systematically dismantle Medicare and gut the Medicaid program, steps that would inexorably lead to greater suffering and penury and many thousands of preventable deaths, one is prompted to ask, “Have you no sense of decency, sir?”

  • Posted on Friday, April 15, 2011
    By Claudia Chaufan | OpEdNews
    So, folks, what is the greatest danger affecting the nation?

  • Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2011
    By Robert Reich | Reader Supported News
    I hope when he tells America how he aims to tame future budget deficits the President doesn't accept conventional Washington wisdom that the biggest problem in the federal budget is Medicare (and its poor cousin Medicaid).

  • Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2011
    By Lisa Priest | The Globe and Mail
    Eight doctors from the U.S.-based Physicians for a National Health Program visited Toronto’s Women’s College Hospital for an inside look at Canada’s single-payer health care system. Hosting the trip was family physician Danielle Martin, chair of Canadian Doctors for Medicare.

  • Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2011
    By Helen Redmond | The Socialist Worker
    "HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act!" read the enthusiastic subject lines on millions of e-mails sent out last month by the union-backed Health Care for America Now coalition.

  • Posted on Wednesday, April 13, 2011
    By NCBR staff | Northern Colorado Business Report
    Even as a bill that would create health insurance exchanges for Colorado is set for a crucial vote on Wednesday morning, Margaret Flowers, M.D., is bringing the case for a single-payer health care system to the state.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 12, 2011
    Ewell G. Scott, M.D. | Letters, Lexington Herald-Leader
    The goings on in Wisconsin should be of interest to all of us. The battle between the "public" worker versus the rest of us, those who work for a nongovernmental entity, the huge majority of Americans, is now grabbing the headlines.

  • Posted on Friday, April 8, 2011
    Editorial | Capital Times (Madison, Wis.)
    Under Republican and Democratic governors, Wisconsin has for the better part of a decade been an innovator — and a national leader — when it comes to providing senior citizens with affordable access to prescription medications. Wisconsin’s approach has made these prescriptions available at a significantly lower cost and with better coverage than the federal Medicare Part D scheme.

  • Posted on Friday, April 8, 2011
    By Robert G. Evans | Toronto Star
    It’s true that total health-care spending in Canada has risen in recent years, taking larger shares of both government revenues and budget allocations. This has led to accusations of “crowding out” other public programs by those favouring further privatization of health care. The data tell a much more nuanced story. The central fact is that, recession years apart, medicare spending — hospitals and physicians’ services — has fluctuated between 4 per cent and 5 per cent of gross domestic product since 1975. After the introduction of medicare in the late 1960s these costs stabilized because universal, comprehensive coverage consolidated expenditures in the hands of a single payer. The cost of health services not covered by medicare has risen from 3 per cent of GDP in 1975 to 7 per cent in 2009.

  • Posted on Friday, April 8, 2011
    By Michael A. Hiltzik | Los Angeles Times
    WellPoint Inc., the nation's largest health insurance company, ran into a snag last year while pursuing an important new business initiative. Federal banking regulators insisted on classifying WellPoint as a healthcare company. And that was interfering with its efforts to open a bank.

  • Posted on Friday, April 8, 2011
    By Wendell Potter | The Center for Public Integrity
    Democrats who think Paul Ryan and his Republican colleagues have foolishly wrapped their arms around the third rail of American politics by proposing to hand the Medicare program to private insurers will themselves look foolish if they take for granted that the public will always be on their side.

  • Posted on Friday, April 8, 2011
    PNHP note: Nancy Raskauskas of the Corvallis Gazette-Times, in her April 4 story about the Corvallis City Council’s meeting that same day, notes: “The council voted 6-3 in favor of supporting House Bill 3510 which would create a single payer health care system for Oregon.” The text of the council's resolution follows

  • Posted on Thursday, April 7, 2011
    By Kip Sullivan, J.D.
    The letter addresses questions such as the fee-for-service method of paying doctors; the overuse or underuse of health care; the impact of managed care programs (including HMOs) on quality of care; “pay for performance” proposals; the role of prevention, disease management, electronic medical records, and quality improvement measures; and the likely role of “accountable care organizations” (ACOs). Sullivan's letter contains extensive data and documentation and is therefore a valuable resource for anyone who is more broadly interested in these matters, not only as they apply to Vermont.

  • Posted on Thursday, April 7, 2011
    By Margaret Flowers, MD | FireDogLake
    Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the Republican chairman of the U.S. House Budget Committee, unveiled two proposals this week which if enacted would constitute a mortal threat to our nation’s health – particularly to the health of our seniors and our most vulnerable populations.

  • Posted on Thursday, April 7, 2011
    By Laura Katz Olson | Columbia University Press Blog
    As the only industrialized nation that does not have some type of universal health care, the United States has long been overdue for reform. Nevertheless, a question remains as to whether Medicaid is an appropriate foundation for such an expansion. In my new book The Politics of Medicaid, I ascertain whether building on the program—adding millions of low-income people to its rolls—is the best means of reducing the ranks of the medically uninsured.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 5, 2011
    By Sue Deppe | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    Vermont’s health reform bill, H.202, outlines a path toward a streamlined, publicly financed, single-payer health care system. There are huge profits at stake for insurance, managed care, and drug firms and their business allies.

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 5, 2011
    By Esther Addley | The Guardian
    The song came about, Donnelly, now 22, told the Guardian, because he has "close family and friends" – his girlfriend is one – "who want to work in the NHS in the future hopefully, but they're worried about the cuts. So I researched it on the internet and I just did the song. I feel for the people that are ill in hospital. If they were privatised they wouldn't be able to afford it." And why focus on Lansley in particular? "Because I'm peed off with the guy."

  • Posted on Monday, April 4, 2011
    By WILLIAM G. SESLER | Erie (Penn.) Times-News
    While doing some research on health-care reform, I came across an interesting story. In 2004, the Canadian Broadcasting Co. conducted polls for Canadians to nominate their choice for the man or woman whom they felt was the best Canadian in history. The person who won was Tommy Douglas.

  • Posted on Friday, April 1, 2011
    By Ginny Lee | Illinois Times (Springfield)
    “Health care is the civil rights issue of the 21st century,” Donna Christensen, a member of Congress, stated Monday evening at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in Springfield. The congresswoman from the U.S. Virgin Islands spoke on “Ethics, Race and Class” to members of the medical community and others.

  • Posted on Friday, April 1, 2011
    Ted Drummond, MD | Letters | Seacoastonline.com
    On a national level, eliminating the Bush tax cuts for people who make over $250,000 a year and shifting our health care system away from one that is profit-driven toward a model centered on health (e.g. Medicare-for-all) would improve our health and pocketbook. Here in New Hampshire, we weathered the recent economic downturn better than many places. Slight adjustments to our current tax structure could easily pay for the cuts some say are "necessary."

  • Posted on Friday, April 1, 2011
    By Kay Tillow | FireDogLake
    Detroit Diesel has been around since April 1937, a few months after the Flint sit down strike that won union recognition. This year, 1,100 retired auto workers at Detroit Diesel suffered a giant cut in company provision of health benefits because their Voluntary Employees Benefits Association, VEBA, went belly up. Workers who retired between 1993 and 2004 will have to pick up an increasing share of the premiums that were once fully covered by the company. Some retirees will have to pay as much as $4,000 per year, or even higher, just to keep their health coverage.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2011
    By Samuel Metz | The Oregonian
    Am I crazy, a physician embracing legislative efforts to create a single-payer health care system in Oregon? You be the judge.

  • Posted on Monday, March 28, 2011
    By Daniel Staples | Times-Argus (Barre-Montpelier, Vt.)
    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders and Gov. Peter Shumlin spoke before health profession students who gathered Saturday at the Statehouse in support of single-payer health care.

  • Posted on Monday, March 28, 2011
    By Garrett Adams | Lexington Herald-Leader
    Since the passage of its landmark health reform law of 2006, the people of Massachusetts have been living like a canary in a coal mine. National health policy experts have been watching them, closely studying how they're faring under the reform.

  • Posted on Monday, March 28, 2011
    By MARVIN MALEK | Barre-Montpelier (Vt.) Times Argus
    I was astonished when I read the rationale given by IBM’s John O’Kane in opposing the inclusion of IBM and other self-insured companies into the single-payer system the Legislature is attempting to craft.

  • Posted on Friday, March 25, 2011
    By Rachel Zimmerman | Commonhealth blog, WBUR.org
    Medical students from Vermont and neighboring states are heading to Montpelier this weekend to rally in support of a publicly-funded, single payer health system for the Green Mountain state.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2011
    By Phillip Longman | Washington Monthly
    Ten years ago, veterans hospitals were dangerous, dirty, and scandal-ridden. Today, they're producing the highest quality care in the country. Their turnaround points the way toward solving America's health-care crisis.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2011
    By Anne Galloway | Vtdigger.com
    You can call it Frank. You can call it Fred. But don’t call it a single-payer health care system. That was the message Rep. Mark Larson, D-Burlington, delivered to lawmakers in the House Appropriations Committee last week and during the House floor debate on Vermont’s latest effort to reform its health care system. The euphemism single-payer was struck from the bill in an amendment to make the legislation more palatable to Republicans, sources say. The bill passed 89-47 after eight hours of debate, speeches, amendments and roll call votes. The legislation now goes to the state Senate.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2011
    By Dr. Claudia Chaufan | OpEdNews.com
    On March 23, a year after President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), "the most expansive social legislation enacted in decades," according to the New York Times, it's worth taking a look at Massachusetts.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2011
    PNHP Board member Dr. Andy Coates and Canadian health economist Bob Evans, Ph.D spoke on March 12, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia at the Affirming Equity: Strengthening Health Care Financing and Delivery conference, hosted by Simon Fraser University. Learn how Canadians students, researchers, health professionals, and health care providers are gathering to affirm equity in their health care system, and fight back against threat of profit-driven financing and delivery. Listen to the conference talks, and to an interview with Dr. Coates on Canadian radio.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2011
    By Suzanne L. King, M.D. | The Berkshire (Mass.) Eagle
    Writing about the Massachusetts health care reform program in a 2009 issue of the Wall Street Journal, Governor Deval Patrick stated, "Because of our reform, families are less likely to be forced into bankruptcy by medical costs." Both Governor Patrick and President Obama have used the benchmark of medical bankruptcy as a key measure to prove the success of their health insurance reforms.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2011
    By Rachel Zimmerman | WBUR
    More than 200 doctors from 39 states and the District of Columbia say they’d consider moving to Vermont if that state switches to a publicly financed single-payer health care system, according affiliates of Physicians for a National Health Program, an organization of physicians who advocate for single-payer national health insurance.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2011
    By Kevin Zeese | FireDogLake
    At its one year anniversary the Obama health care law is shrinking while the health care crisis grows. Americans who lack any health coverage still exceeds 50 million, over 45,000 deaths occur annually due to lack of health insurance, and 40 million Americans, including over 10 million children, are underinsured.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2011
    By Polly Toynbee | The Guardian
    [European] systems differ, built on each country's distinct social history, all reflecting national stories. But all are basically state-funded through taxation, even if at first glance they look like insurance schemes. Essentially, the working healthy pay for the sick and the old, who are the heaviest users of care.

  • Posted on Monday, March 21, 2011
    By Maria Termini | The Bay State Banner
    Health care in the United State is in a crisis. Our present health care system is fragmented between multiple private insurance companies and government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. The system is controlled by the profit making insurance industry and based on each person’s ability to pay and not based on needed medical care.

  • Posted on Monday, March 21, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington Free Press
    Tuesday the Vermont House of Representatives begins debate on health-care reform — one of the most important bills of the session for Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin and the Democratic majorities in the Legislature.

  • Posted on Monday, March 21, 2011
    Editorial | Bennington (Vt.) Banner
    Part of the blame for the demise of Bennington Iron Works, which announced this week it will close by May after 43 years, was that it faced "relentless" competition from Canadian firms in the manufacture of steel products for construction and other uses.

  • Posted on Monday, March 21, 2011
    By Lauren Else | In These Times
    Three weeks after the House of Representatives voted to repeal last year’s landmark healthcare reform legislation, and one week after a federal judge ruled the bill’s insurance mandate unconstitutional, Vermont’s leaders decided to take matters into their own hands.

  • Posted on Friday, March 18, 2011
    By Robert Speer | Chico (Calif.) News and Review
    To understand why the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has fallen short of what President Obama envisioned for health-care reform, consider the story of Billy Tauzin, as told by Dr. Jeff Lobosky.

  • Posted on Friday, March 18, 2011
    By Carey Goldberg | WBUR, Boston NPR
    There’s a new cause that calls for getting on the bus. Next Saturday morning, (3/26), dozens of Boston-area medical students and others heading into health care careers plan to board buses for Montpelier, to rally at the State House in support of the single-payer system that Vermont leaders aim to create.

  • Posted on Friday, March 18, 2011
    By Annie Brown | EDGE (Boston)
    Patients, doctors and health insurance companies are engaged in a historic debate surrounding the future of healthcare in America. Most of the discussions surrounding healthcare are led by politicians who either celebrate President Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) as a necessary first step towards equal access or view it as a direct assault on constitutional rights. However, there are millions of patients and physicians who aren’t pleased with either party’s response to the healthcare crisis.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2011
    William C. Hsiao, Ph.D. | NEJM
    The United States faces two major problems in the health care arena: the swelling ranks of the uninsured and soaring costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) makes great strides in addressing the former problem but offers only modest pilot efforts to address the latter. Experience in countries such as Taiwan and Canada shows that single-payer health care systems can achieve universal coverage and control inflation of health care costs.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011
    By Anne Galloway | VtDigger.com
    What happened to Sabra Ewing, could have happened, as she put it, to anyone. She had a high deductible ($20,000) health insurance plan for her family. For years, doctors had told Ewing she was healthy, and she stopped going in for annual checkups to avoid the expense. Then one day she found a dark spot on the side of her heel. It took her three weeks to get an appointment with a dermatologist. By the time Ewing was diagnosed, she had stage three melanoma.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011
    By NEAL P. GOSWAMI | Bennington Banner
    Dozens of Vermonters offered thoughts on health care reform in Vermont to members of the House and Senate Health Care Committees during a statewide interactive hearing Monday.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011
    By Carl Berdahl | Atrium Magazine
    In the wake of ineffective national health reform, Vermont is poised to try again: Legislators are considering guaranteeing—rather than mandating—health insurance for all Vermonters through a single-payer system.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011
    By Anthony Brooks | WBUR Boston Radio
    As many states, and Republicans in Congress, are looking for ways to roll back President Obama’s signature health care law, Vermont is moving in a different direction.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011
    By Dr. Claudia Chaufan | Santa Cruz (Calif.) Sentinel
    March is Women's History Month. But this year, for the vast majority of women in America, there is little to celebrate.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By Rebecca Robinson | The Lund Report (Portland, Ore.)
    Supporters of single-payer healthcare legislation had their day in Salem Friday, with a well-attended hearing on the Capitol steps and an emotional hearing for the single-payer bill, House Bill 3510, before the House Health Care Committee.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By Bill Graves | The Oregonian
    A House hearing Friday on a bill to establish a single-payer universal health care plan in Oregon drew testimony from about two dozen people, most in favor of the proposal.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By BENNETT HALL | Corvallis Gazette-Times
    Shortly after noon on Friday, state Rep. Michael Dembrow stepped to the microphone and addressed a crowd of about 150 people gathered on the steps of the Oregon Capitol in Salem. “You look so healthy,” he told his audience. “You must all have good health insurance.”

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By BENNETT HALL | Corvallis Gazette-Times
    It’s 8 o’clock in the morning, and Betty Johnson and Mike Huntington are huddled around a cordless phone set up on a folding table in Johnson’s Corvallis living room. The two veteran health care activists listen intently to the voices coming over the speaker.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By Ronald Pies, M.D. | OpEdNews
    In a recent piece in the Boston Globe, David Abel described a 52-year-old woman named Ona Stewart. Despite being deaf and blind, she is able to live independently, and earn a living by making pottery. Ona Stewart has no family in the area, and relies on a state-funded program that provides aides who help her communicate, shop, and run errands.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    By Dr. James Mitchiner | AnnArbor.com
    Well, Karl Rove has done it again. In a recent opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal (“The Politics of Saving ‘Granny,’” Feb. 3), the former Bush presidential adviser sings the praises of replacing traditional Medicare with a federal voucher system.

  • Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011
    Dr. Arthur J. Sutherland III | Letters | Memphis Commercial Appeal
    Our health system is really a health care market that is not "free" and has many distortions. PPACA is flawed because it continues our nation's reliance on an inefficient, wasteful and costly private insurance model of financing health care. Nationally we deny health care access to millions, bankrupt patients and families, ratchet up costs and frustrate efforts to improve quality.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    By Steve Early | The Nation
    After years of political frustration, Earl Mongeon had to see it to believe it. Often, when he finishes his twelve-hour night shift at IBM in Essex Junction, Mongeon heads home for breakfast and a few hours of brush clearing on his sixty-acre lot in Westford. In mid-January, the 55-year-old microprocessor assembler and workers’ rights advocate hopped into his car and drove in the opposite direction, to Montpelier. There, at the state Capitol, Mongeon and other supporters of single-payer healthcare gathered to hear Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy, Congressman Peter Welch and new Democratic Governor Peter Shumlin explain that last year’s national healthcare bill — a costly mix of subsidies to private medical plans, some insurance market reforms, Medicaid expansion and a mandate that people buy coverage if they don’t already have it — isn’t good enough for the Green Mountain State.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    Dr. Charles Benedict: I want to start off by thanking the medical students, some of my colleagues – there are physicians up here, there are nurses up here, there are future physicians, future nurses, health care people, social workers. We’re all banding together in support of the cause up here, which is to – and we usually don’t like to use this word – kill the bill!

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    From All Unions Committee For Single Payer Health Care--HR 676 | Press Release
    On February 11, 2011, Congressman John Conyers, Jr., Democrat of Michigan, reintroduced Expanded and Improved Medicare for All, HR 676, the national single payer health care legislation, into the 112th Congress. With minor changes, such as the addition of oral surgery to the benefits, HR 676 is the same and will provide all medically necessary care to everyone through progressive public funding and elimination of private health insurance companies. There are no premiums, no co-pays, no co-insurance, no deductibles.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    By Tim Gaynor | MSNBC
    A pacemaker and defibrillator fitted to carpenter Douglas Gravagna's failing heart makes even rising from the couch of his Phoenix-valley home a battle. But it is not congestive heart failure that is killing him, he says. It is a decision by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer to stop funding for some organ transplants as the state struggles to reduce a yawning budget deficit.

  • Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011
    Medical Economics
    If Massachusetts’ experience with healthcare reform is any guide, national reform won’t greatly reduce the number of your patients forced into bankruptcy because of their medical bills.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    The following text contains the March 10 testimonies of professor Ellen Oxfeld of Vermont Health Care for All and Dr. Peggy Carey, interim chair of the Vermont chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program, before the Vermont House Committee on Health Care, regarding H.202, “An Act Relating to a Single-Payer and Unified Health System.”

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    By Don McCanne, M.D.
    As the author of a PNHP blog entry in November 2010 on the limitations of the Wyden-Brown amendment, which would move up the date when states could obtain waivers from the federal government to introduce their own state-based health reforms, I'd like to clarify my position.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011
    By Michelle Roberts, Health reporter | BBC News
    People living in England enjoy better health than Americans, despite less investment in healthcare, research published in the US has revealed.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Joan Brunwasser | OpEdNews.com
    My guest today is Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, professor of medicine at Harvard University and a member of Physicians for a National Health Program.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Christian Nordqvist | Medical News Today
    Since Massachusetts implemented its landmark 2006 legislation which made the purchase of health insurance compulsory, the number of personal bankruptcies associated to medical bills or illness has increased, researchers revealed in American Journal of Medicine. Total medical bankruptcies rose from 7,504 in 2007 to 10,093 in 2009 in the state.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    By Margaret Flowers | t r u t h o u t
    The president supports state innovation in health care, but vigilance is required to ensure state reforms improve health as we continue to call for national reform.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Dr. Bruce Trigg | Albuquerque Journal
    Today is Human Rights Day at the State Capitol. And today Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino will present Senate Joint Resolution 5 for a state constitutional amendment that will recognize health care as a human right to the first legislative committee to which it has been assigned.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    U.S. News and World Report The percentage of personal bankruptcies caused by medical bills or personal illness has changed only slightly since Massachusetts began requiring people to buy health insurance in 2006, a new study finds.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Jason Millman | The Hill
    An individual mandate has done little to stem the rate of medical bankruptcies in Massachusetts, boding poorly for the federal healthcare reform law enacted almost a year ago, according to a new liberal study.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Kay Lazar | The Boston Globe
    The 2006 Massachusetts law that required nearly everyone to buy health insurance has not significantly staunched residents' pain from medical bankruptcies, according to a new study.

  • Posted on Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    By Eryn Brown | Los Angeles Times
    Studying medical bankruptcies in Massachusetts, whose recent healthcare reform was a model for national reform, researchers found that while new insurance rules increased the number of people who had coverage, those rules did not improve coverage -- leaving many still struggling with medical debt.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    By the end of this week, the House HealthCare Committee will vote on a bill that authorizes the building blocks for a future single-payer health care system.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Samuel Metz, M.D. | Portland (Ore.) Alliance
    The private health insurance industry, sacred cow of Democrats and Republicans alike, produces a 40 percent administrative loss. This is not a misprint. Private health insurance financing is 10 – repeat – 10 times more costly than all known single-payer agencies.

  • Posted on Monday, March 7, 2011
    By Nancy Remsen | Burlington (Vt.) Free Press
    For Dr. Robert Penney, a primary care physician who has practiced in Vermont for 25 years, there isn't any question about the need to reform health care.

  • Posted on Friday, March 4, 2011
    Adam Sullivan | WCAX News
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center's Frank McDougall knows a lot of people who impact the health care industry in New Hampshire and Vermont, and all the way to the White House.

  • Posted on Friday, March 4, 2011
    By Larry Carson | The Baltimore Sun
    The idea of a single-payer health care system was lost in the debate over the much-amended national health care reform1 passed by Congress last year, but three Howard County delegates are co-sponsors of legislation in this year's General Assembly that seeks to bring the idea to fruition in the Free State.

  • Posted on Thursday, March 3, 2011
    By Rose Ann DeMoro | The Huffington Post
    The past two weeks have been a "Where's Waldo" moment for President Obama. He's been largely a bystander while tens of thousands of American workers, joined by students, and community allies, marched in Madison's snow and freezing temperatures, and slept on the floors of the capitol to defend their most fundamental right to freedom of assembly and a collective voice.

  • Posted on Wednesday, March 2, 2011
    The following is a slightly edited translation of an interview with Edgar A. Lopez, M.D., F.A.C.S., which was conducted in Spanish by journalist Pablo Castelo of Al Día en América in early February. Dr. Lopez is a member of Physicians for a National Health Program and Kentuckians for Single Payer Health Care.